Courage is not limited to the battlefield or the Indianapolis 500 or bravely catching a thief in your house.  The real tests of courage are much quieter.  They are inner tests, like remaining faithful when nobody’s looking, like enduring pain when the room is empty, like standing alone when you’re misunderstood. ~ Charles Swindoll

Investigating accidents, incidents, sentinel events, equipment failures, and quality issues requires courage.  Courage to challenge the way work is performed.  Courage to ask questions that people hope won’t be asked.  Courage to point out ways that management can improve the way the facility is managed.

Remember, when you think you face the challenge of confronting people and influencing them to change … courageously look for a different path.

Instead of forcing your views, find a way to make yourself an ally of those you think must change.  Your objective is to create an environment where you have an opportunity to share your vision and create enthusiasm for it.  As an ally, you learn how they view the problem in greater detail.  You may even discover some of your assumptions were wrong.  As an ally, they are more open to receive your ideas.  When you are work as a team – rather than adversaries – the chances of success are much higher.