News

WhoDunIt? Things Are Heating Up Pre-Summit

Posted: April 7th, 2014 in Summit

If you look closely, there is not only an outline of a body on the floor but blood on the corner of the striped couch. Looks like a murder mystery, but it is part of the 2-Day Pre-Summit TapRooT® Evidence Collection Course.

whodunit

Best Practice Session 1 – Global TapRooT® Summit

Posted: April 7th, 2014 in Best Practice Presentations, Best Practice Presenters, Summit

Here are the presentations and handouts received thus far for:

Best Practice Session 1
Wednesday, April 9, 2014
10:30 a.m. – noon

at the 2014 Global TapRooT® Summit. Presentations will be uploaded as they are received. If the presentation you are looking for is not available, check back later. If you have any questions, please e-mail Barb.

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TapRooT® Users Share Best Practices (Linda Unger, Benna Dortch and Michelle Wishoun) (Presentation will be uploaded when received from presenter.)

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Advanced Causal Factor Development (Ken Turnbull)

Causal Factor Worksheet

Causal Factor Worksheet Portrait

Safeguard Chart with Categories

Potential Causal Factor Test

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Character Driven Success (Beverly Chiodo) (View presentation.)

Best Practice Session 2 – 2014 Global TapRooT® Summit

Posted: April 7th, 2014 in Best Practice Presentations, Best Practice Presenters, Summit

Here are the presentations and handouts received thus far for:

Best Practice Session 2
Wednesday, April 9, 2014
1:00 p.m. to 2:20 p.m.

at the 2014 Global TapRooT® Summit. Presentations will be uploaded as they are received. If the presentation you are looking for is not available, check back later. If you have any questions, please e-mail Barb.

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Slips, Trips and Falls: The Science Behind Walking HSL (Robert Shaw) (View presentation.)

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Maintenance & Safety Improvement – How They Are Related (Jade Washmon) (View presentation.)

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Error Proof Health Care – How to Accelerate Your Improvement Efforts (Kevin McManus) (View presentation.)

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Using TapRooT® for a Process Improvement (Jonathan Kennedy) (View presentation.)

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A Beginner’s Guide to Investigation Using TapRooT® Single User Software (Ralph Brickey) (View outline - Presentation will not be public.)

Best Practice Session 3 – 2014 Global TapRooT® Summit

Posted: April 7th, 2014 in Best Practice Presentations, Best Practice Presenters, Summit

Here are the presentations and handouts received thus far for:

Best Practice Session 3
Wednesday, April 9, 2014
2:40 p.m. to 3:50 p.m.

at the 2014 Global TapRooT® Summit. Presentations will be uploaded as they are received from the presenters. If you have any questions, please e-mail Barb.

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Using TapRooT® to Prevent Serious Injuries and Fatalities (Dave Janney) (View presentation.)

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Where is Your Equipment Reliability Program? The Good, The Bad & The Ugly (Mark Olson) (View presentation.)

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How Good Communication Changes Human Performance (Clare Solomon and Mark Ormond)(Handout 1) (Handout 2)

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Systems Root Cause Analysis of Intergenerational Issues (Akivah Northern) (Presentation will be uploaded when received from presenter.)

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Measure Your RCA System: The Good, The Bad & The Ugly (Richard Mesker, Ralph Blessing, Brian Dolin) (Presentation will be uploaded when received from presenter.)

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TapRooT® Case Studies (Kevin McManus) (View presentation.)

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Stump (and Advise) the Software Experts (TapRooT® Development Team) (Presentation will be uploaded when received from presenter.)

Best Practice Session 4 – Global TapRooT® Summit

Posted: April 7th, 2014 in Best Practice Presentations, Best Practice Presenters, Summit

Here are the presentations and handouts received thus far for:

Best Practice Session 4
Thursday, April 10, 2014
9:10 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

at the 2014 Global TapRooT® Summit. Presentations will be uploaded as they are received. If the presentation you are looking for is not available, check back later. If you have any questions, please e-mail Barb.

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What’s New in the TapRooT® Software (Dan Verlinde) (Presentation will be uploaded when received from presenter.)

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The Business End of Equipment Reliability, Part 1 (Heinz Bloch) (View Presentation.)

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Why Exceeding Customer Expectations is Wrong (Chris Vallee) (Presentation will be uploaded when received from presenter.)

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Do You Have What It Takes To Sell Safety? (Clare Solomon & Larry Perkinson) (Presentation will be uploaded when received from presenter. (Handout 1) (Handout 2)

Best Practice Session 5 – 2014 Global TapRooT® Summit

Posted: April 7th, 2014 in Best Practice Presentations, Best Practice Presenters, Summit

Here are the presentations and handouts received thus far for:

Best Practice Session 5
Thursday, April 10, 2014
10:50 a.m. to noon

at the 2014 Global TapRooT® Summit. Presentations will be uploaded as they are received. If the presentation you are looking for is not available, check back later. If you have any questions, please e-mail Barb.

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Get Your RCA PhD: Advanced Root Cause Analysis Using TapRooT® (Mark Paradies) (View Presentation.)

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The Business End of Equipment Reliability, Part 2 (Heinz Bloch) (View Presentation.)

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Slips, Trips and Falls: The Science Behind Walking HSL (Rob Shaw) (View Presentation.)

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Metrics & Trending

Kevin McManus – Your Metrics Must Have a Purpose (View Presentation.)

Chris Vallee – (Presentation will be posted when received from presenter.)

Best Practice Session 6 – 2014 Global TapRooT® Summit

Posted: April 7th, 2014 in Best Practice Presentations, Best Practice Presenters, Summit

Here are the presentations and handouts received thus far for:

Best Practice Session 6
Thursday, April 10, 2014
1:00 p.m. to 2:20 p.m.

at the 2014 Global TapRooT® Summit. Presentations will be uploaded as they are received. If the presentation you are looking for is not available, check back later. If you have any questions, please e-mail Barb.

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TapRooT® Certified Instructor Recertification Workshop (Presentation is not public – Certified Instructors only.)

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The Foundations of Equifactor® (Heinz Bloch) (View presentation.)

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Human Performance Tools & Organizational Factors (Mark Paradies and Frank Verschueren)

(View Mark Paradies’ Presentation.)

(View Frank Verschueren’s Presentation.)

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Expert Facilitation of Investigations Using TapRooT® Software (Brian Tink) (Presentation will be uploaded when received from presenter.)

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Driving Safety – Culture Leads to Success (Bruce Huber) (View outline - presentation will not be public.)

 

Best Practice Session 7 – 2014 Global TapRooT® Summit

Posted: April 7th, 2014 in Best Practice Presentations, Best Practice Presenters, Summit

Here are the presentations and handouts received thus far for:

Best Practice Session 7
Thursday April 10, 2014
2:40 p.m. to 3:50 p.m.

at the 2014 Global TapRooT® Summit. Presentations will be uploaded as they are received. If the presentation you are looking for is not available, check back later. If you have any questions, please e-mail Barb.

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Infamous Accidents:

  • Piper Alpha (Alan Smith & Alan Scott) (Presentation will be uploaded when received from presenter.)
  • Titanic (Harry Thorburn) (View Presentation)

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Fatigue & Human Performance – The Tell Tale Signs of Fatigue-Related Mistakes (William Sirois) (Presentation will be uploaded soon.)

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CAPA Best Practices: Is Your Industry Really that Different?

  • Power Distribution Industry: Establishing and Sustaining a Corrective Action Steering Committee (Amy Bratkovic) (View Presentation.)
  • Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Corrective Action Effecitveness Review Approach (Theresa Triplett) (View Presentation.)

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How We Implemented TapRooT® Enterprise Software (Scott Gunderson & Jennifer Hegert)

(View Scott Gunderson’s presentation.)

(View Jennifer Hegert’s presentation.)

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The Foundations of Equifactor® (Heinz Bloch) (View Presentation.)

Best Practice Session 8 – 2014 Global TapRooT® Summit

Posted: April 7th, 2014 in Best Practice Presentations, Best Practice Presenters, Summit

Here are the presentations and handouts received thus far for:

Best Practice Session 8
Friday, April 11, 2014
8:00 a.m. to 8:50 a.m.

the 2014 Global TapRooT® Summit. Presentations will be uploaded as they are received. If the presentation you are looking for is not available, check back later. If you have any questions, please e-mail Barb.

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Interviewing: DeCoding Non-Verbal Communication (Barb Phillips) (View Presentation.)

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Best Practices in Equipment Reliability (Heinz Bloch) (View presentation.)

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Wellness Programs (Dr. Becky Blessing and Ralph Blessing) (View presentation.)

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High Reliability Industry Lessons Learned for Healthcare (Gard Clark, Kay Gallogly & Dana Barclay) (View presentation.)

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Test Drive the Version 6 Software (Dan Verlinde) (Presentation will be uploaded when received from presenter.)

Career Development: Top Four Tips to Remember Names

Posted: March 30th, 2014 in Career Development, Career Development Tips

introduction2I admire people who can always remember a name, but I’m not one of them. I’ve never been creative enough to use the trick of associating a name with something about the person (like, David Bayer has thinning hair … at my age, everyone’s hair is thinning so that would just confuse me more). The ability to remember names is a valuable business skill so I have picked up some tips I can use. Here are four ways to help remember important names career development.

Focus on the person, not yourself. This is in the #1 spot because it truly is the #1 tip. If I’m too focused on how I’m presenting myself or on what brilliant thing I want to say next, it totally blows any chance at name recall. The truth is, most of the time we can’t remember a person’s name because we were thinking about something else when we were introduced to that person.

Verify the name. Names have many variations. William may prefer to be called “Will” but the conference planner’s assistant typed “William” on his badge. Here’s your chance to verify the name, “Hello, William … oh, do you prefer William or … ?” “I prefer Will.” “Okay, Will, are you enjoying the conference?” Verifying the name will allow you to repeat it several times without being obvious that you’re using a memory trick.

Hear the name, speak the name, listen to yourself say the name. Studies show that if you don’t repeat those actions within the first 10 seconds, you”ll forget the person’s name. “Hello, David, nice to meet you.” “So, David, what are you working on at the Mill?” “Traveling anywhere this summer, David?” If repeating the name makes it too obvious that you are using the repetition method, look at the person and say the name silently to yourself several times when the person takes a drink, turns to say something to someone else, or some other appropriate moment that doesn’t steal your focus from what the other person is saying. Or, do what Franklin Roosevelt did and picture it written across the person’s forehead.

Ask how to spell a difficult name. Just like studying for the spelling bee — focusing on the spelling of the name will help you with recall. Another way to keep it in your mind is to imagine writing it letter by letter.

These tips will help you recall a name, but it they fail, there is nothing wrong with honesty, “I remember you well, but your name just slipped my mind!”

5 Shocking Design Mistakes to Avoid in Your Powerpoint Presentations

Posted: March 24th, 2014 in Career Development, Career Development Tips

We are gearing up for the 2014 Global TapRooT® Summit week that begins just one week from today, and as we put the final touches on our Powerpoint presentations, I thought this would be a good time to share Jesse Desjardins slides about how to make them great. Jesse says, “You don’t make friends with bad PowerPoint presentations.”

The 5-Day TapRooT® Course Provides Practical ‘How-to’ in Finding Root Causes

Posted: March 23rd, 2014 in Courses, Testimonials

Time to draw a name in our “Recommend for a Chance to Win” contest!

And the winner is … James Dougherty!

James said,

“The 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader course is very informative and provides practical ‘how to’ guidance to get to the root cause of an event in order to take corrective action to reduce the chance of a repeat occurrence. Further through the use of TapRooT® one can conduct an systematic analysis of potential things that can go wrong or a preliminary hazard or operational analysis. TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis has been helpful to me.”

IMG_3228

Thank you, James, for sharing your experience with TapRooT®!

And if your name wasn’t drawn, you still may win in our future weekly drawings. Thanks for recommending us!

Want to learn more about what others think about TapRooT®? Read the full recommendations by visiting our Services page on LinkedIn:

https://www.linkedin.com/company/system-improvements-inc./products?trk=top_nav_products

If you want to learn more about our 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Training, visit:

http://www.taproot.com/courses#5-day-root

And there’s still time to sign up for the 2014 Global TapRooT® Summit! Learn more here:

http://www.taproot.com/taproot-summit

Already been to a TapRooT® Course? You can recommend for a chance to win:

http://www.taproot.com/archives/42698

 

 

Career Development: Are You a Trustworthy Boss? 3 Qualities Revealed

Posted: March 17th, 2014 in Career Development, Career Development Tips

© Yanik Chauvin

Last week we learned how to find out what our boss thinks about us. But what if you are the boss? Do your employees think you are trustworthy? Here are 3 qualities that prove you are.

1. What you say and do are aligned with your company’s value statements.  Have you looked at the mission statement printed in your employee handbook and the core values you brag about on your company website lately? Your employees know the message you are sending, and if they are not living those value statements under your leadership, you are losing major points in trustworthiness.

2. You don’t change your story. Does your story change depending on who you are talking to? Employees don’t trust bosses when they hear them changing their stories.  Whether you recognize it or not, your employees are listening when you are talking to other company members or to clients. They are watching you interact with others when they are copied on e-mails. Don’t lose trust by making them wonder what you’re trying to hide.

3. You do your job. Untrustworthy bosses only appear to be doing their jobs. They may not bother to be up-to-date on the skills necessary to perform their jobs effectively, so they fake it, or worse, blame their mistakes on employees. This kind of dishonest behavior will ensure your employees always keep an updated résumé ready to go.

What do you think? What characteristics are important to prove trustworthiness as a boss?

Winners announced! Who Else Wants a Chance to Win a Cool T-Shirt?

Posted: March 11th, 2014 in Courses, Testimonials

To kick off our weekly drawing, I drew not one, but two names in our “Recommend for a Chance to Win” contest today.

Congrats to Cyrus S. and Tony L.!

And if your name wasn’t drawn, you still may win in our future weekly drawings. Thanks for recommending us!

IMG_3228Cyrus, who recommended our 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Training, noticed that TapRooT® works across all industries.  That is a comment that we love to hear, and we are looking forward to our next Global TapRooT® Summit April 7 – 11, 2014 where oil refineries, hospitals, aviation, oil E&P, nuclear plants, high tech manufacturing facilities, shipping, pipelines, mining, rail and light rail, chemical plants, and electricity transmission and distribution will all be represented.

Tony mentioned in his recommendation of our 5-Day course that he appreciates we are only a phone call or e-mail away. We strive to make folks who attend our courses and our Summit feel like they are part of the TapRooT® Team — not just an attendee.

Thank you, Tony and Cyrus, for sharing your experience with TapRooT®!

Want to learn more about what others think about TapRooT®? Read the full recommendations by visiting our Services page on LinkedIn:

https://www.linkedin.com/company/system-improvements-inc./products?trk=top_nav_products

If you want to learn more about our 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Training, visit:

http://www.taproot.com/courses#5-day-root

And there’s still time to sign up for the 2014 Global TapRooT® Summit! Learn more here:

http://www.taproot.com/taproot-summit

Already been to a TapRooT® Course? You can recommend for a chance to win:

http://www.taproot.com/archives/42698

 

 

Career Development: Are You Irreplaceable? 6 Questions that Reveal What Your Boss is Thinking

Posted: March 10th, 2014 in Career Development, Career Development Tips
pink-slip-2

Avoid the Pink Slip!

Last week we learned how to do a quick self-evaluation of our job performance. How did you do? This week we’ll dig a little deeper and look at it from a different perspective, not what we think about ourselves but what our boss thinks about us.

While unemployed workers seem more optimistic about finding a job in 2014, the pressure to be more innovative, productive and flexible has never been greater. If you are currently employed, you may not be thinking about what this means to you … but you should.  Don’t be blindsided by an unexpected layoff.

Here are 6 critical questions to ask yourself to find out if your boss thinks you are irreplaceable.

Question #1:  What skills do I possess that meet the current and future demands of my job market?

It is crucial to understand the current wants and needs of the job market even when we are employed. We have no control over this factor but we can work to understand market trends and tweak our skills to align with them. Your boss is thinking about the capabilities of workers in your position, so make sure you are up-to-date.

Question #2: What am I doing to improve my performance for the facility I work for?

Seek to improve your personal skill set on a daily basis. Today’s successful employee is not simply doing what they are paid to do but looking to bring value to what they provide. Get noticed!

Question #3: What is the main thing I do during my work day that keeps my boss from replacing me right now?

If you want to measure how easy your boss thinks it is to replace you, you need to consider 1) current competition for your position and 2) how well you understand what your boss wants you to do. Staying competitive and doing what your boss needs done secures your position.

Question #4: Do I engage each day in the most important tasks associated with my position?

Strategic focus is looking at the day ahead, and deciding to spend your time on the most productive activities. Stop chasing rabbit trails. Choose the activities that have the greatest impact on your bottom line.

Question #5: Am I relying too much on digital technology to communicate with my boss?

Email won’t shed much light on your personality and admirable characteristics. It may be tempting to e-mail every communication to your boss, but picking up the phone, or walking into his or her office for a face-to-face will increase your positive interaction and relationship. Do face time. Not Apple FaceTime, but real face time.

Question #6: Do people seek my advice in my area of expertise?

Position yourself so that people you work with seek you out as an authority to make decisions in your area of expertise. When you become an expert inside and outside of your organization, you increase your value.

So, now you have an idea of what your boss is thinks about you. But what if you are the boss? Do your employees trust you to see the hard work they are doing? Next week we will talk about 3 qualities of a trustworthy boss.

(And for more info about being irreplaceable at work, read:  Invaluable: The Secret to Becoming Irreplaceable, by Dave Crenshaw.)

Remembering An Accident: Two Suspended Hotel Walkways Collapse July 17, 1981 – 114 Killed

Posted: March 7th, 2014 in Accidents, Video

01_Lobby_jpg_650x500_upscale_q85

On July 17, 1981, a 32-ton, 12-foot long fourth floor walkway that spanned over and across the Hyatt Regency Kansas City lobby collapsed and crashed into the second floor walkway of equal size and weight. Both walkways landed in the  lobby /atrium area where a dance competition (with approximately 1,600 people in attendance) was being held. The rescue operation lasted 14 hours, 114 people were killed and another 216 were injured.

27hyatt.xlarge1

Investigators found that changes to the design of the walkway’s steel tie rods were the cause of its failure.

$140 million was awarded to victims and their families,  and the tragedy remains a classic model for the study of engineering ethics and errors. After the collapse, the lobby was reconstructed with only one crossing on the second floor, supported by several columns underneath it rather than being suspended from the ceiling.

Download and read report at National Institute of Standards and Technology:

http://fire.nist.gov/bfrlpubs/build82/art002.html

 

Food Company Fined after Worker Suffers Partial Amputation of Fingers

Posted: March 4th, 2014 in Accidents, Current Events

A 45-year-old food company worker lost part of two fingers that were caught in a rotating drum. The HSE inspector stated that if the machine was properly guarded, the accident wouldn’t have happened. In addition to fines, the company was also banned from using the machine until it was sufficiently guarded. (Read full story on Brent & Kilburn Times.)

Don’t Make a Decision You’ll Someday Regret – Join Our Community Today

Posted: March 4th, 2014 in Accidents, Jokes
1981 Louisville, Kentucky Sewer Explosion

1981 Louisville, Kentucky Sewer Explosion

Underestimating the power of projectiles, relying on your friends to lift you up, (or catch you when you fall), taking a shortcut –  these are all subtitles to funny videos recently posted by Mashable that underscore decisions people make that they immediately regret.

Here is a link to the videos: http://mashable.com/2014/03/03/i-regret-everything/

On a more serious note, it reminds me of the weekly eNewsletter we put together – we include regular columns like “How Far Away is Death” and “Monday Accidents and Lessons Learned” and yes, we always include a joke for our readers too, but sometimes it takes looking at destructive consequences of actions that people take and later regret before we are inspired to make a change and keep our workplaces safer.

If you’re not a subscriber, won’t you join our community of experts around the world as we work together to change the way the world solves problems? Here is our recent weekly edition:

http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs158/1101367353511/archive/1116707105164.html

Lessons *Not* Learned from Deepwater Horizon & Texas City (and How to Improve Investigations)

Posted: March 3rd, 2014 in Accidents, Best Practice Presentations, Presentations, Summit

Mark Paradies, President of System Improvements, Inc./TapRooT®, presents a view of lessons *not* learned according previous reports related to Deepwater Horizon & Texas City. In this 2013 Global TapRooT® Summit presentation he critiques the failure to learn and prevent accident recurrence, and offers suggestions to improve investigations.


View four-part video of this presentation:

Part One

Part Two

Part Three

Part Four

Career Development: 6 Questions To Advance Your Career Right Now (and a Humorous Look Back)

Posted: March 3rd, 2014 in Career Development, Career Development Tips

Do you ever review old reports you wrote, important e-mails you sent, big projects you completed and cringe? Reviewing past work can be a little scary, but an honest self-evaluation can be a great opportunity to advance your career development.

A lot of employers send the message that, “If I don’t say anything to you, then you are doing a good job.” But this doesn’t do much for your career advancement and development. In fact, this kind culture can really make you feel stuck. And why do we give so much credit to what someone else says about our work anyway? We should avoid letting the comments of others define our potential and capabilities. And we should avoid giving someone else all of the responsibility for our own advancement.

Reviewing old work and writing out a self-evaluation for your eyes only just once a year is a proactive step for performance improvement. It doesn’t have to be time-consuming to do this.

Here are six simple questions to consider that will help you set your own professional goals and advance your career:

1. What are my strengths? (Not what other people think they are, what you think they are. Write them down!)
2. How can I use them more in my current tasks? (Brainstorm some ideas – you’ll be surprised at the results!)
3. What are my weaknesses? (Again, not what other people think they are, what you think they are. Write them down!)
4. How can I overcome my weaknesses? (The first step is developing a couple of new routines and then sticking to them.)
5. What can I do better this year? (Be honest!)
6. Where can I take initiative and become a better employee who contributes more? (Look around – opportunities are all around you, I promise!)

Self-evaluations are important to your career development. Next week, I will introduce a new way to look at self-evaluation questions (and we’ll find out if your boss thinks you are irreplaceable). Until then, here is a humorous look at the types of reactions we can have when we look at our past work. Taking charge of your own performance improvement through self-evaluation will ensure that the next time you review your work, you’ll think, “I am awesome!”

past_work_20px
(Comic courtesy of 20px.com.)

Are You Missing Important Updates?

Posted: February 26th, 2014 in TapRooT

If you don’t have time to check the Root Cause Analysis Blog every week, you could be missing career changing updates! Subscribe to our weekly eNewsletter and don’t miss a thing. Here is yesterday’s edition:

http://archive.constantcontact.com/fs158/1101367353511/archive/1116578600682.html

UK Worker Trapped and Pulled Toward Band-Saw, Narrowly Escapes Death

Posted: February 26th, 2014 in Accidents, Current Events

An industrial worker in the UK who was cutting posts narrowly escaped death when he couldn’t disable a machine he was trapped in as he was pulled toward a band-saw.  Although he lost his arm in the accident, he is grateful to be be able to tell his story. (Read story on thewestcountry.co.uk.)

Would you like help reducing serious injuries at your facility? Mark Paradies has an upcoming 2-day Pre-Summit course with important ideas to revolutionize your fatality/major accident prevention programs and start you down the road to eliminating major accidents.

LEARN MORE about this Pre-Summit course on the TapRooT® Global Summit website and consider joining us for Summit week by also attending the 3-day Global TapRooT® Summit.

Have You Been to a TapRooT® Course or the Summit? Recommend for a Chance to Win!

Posted: February 25th, 2014 in TapRooT

t-shirtHave you attended TapRooT® training or our Global TapRooT® Summit?

Are you on LinkedIn?

If so, you have a chance to win a cool TapRooT® t-shirt!

Here’s how:

  1. Log in to LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/system-improvements-inc. (If it doesn’t open our Company Page, search for “System Improvements | TapRooT®” in the LinkedIn search box.)
  2. Follow us on LinkedIn (by clicking the yellow “Follow” button on the top right).
  3. Then click the “Services” tab on the top left (under our company name, next to “Home”)
  4. Select the name of the training you attended or the Summit, and leave a recommendation.

That’s it – leave a brief recommendation and follow us on LinkedIn, and you’ll be entered to win our monthly drawing for a new shirt. Ready, set, GO!

Career Development: What Kind of Procrastinator are You?

Posted: February 24th, 2014 in Career Development, Career Development Tips

Procrastination at work can grow from many root causes, including feeling overwhelmed by a project to avoiding tasks because we don’t enjoy them to being passive aggressive because of a conflict with a manager. Fear can cause us to procrastinate too – fear of making a mistake, fear of failing and looking really dumb, fear of the unknown.

So, if you are a perfectionist, this article isn’t about you. Contrary to popular belief, research shows that procrastination doesn’t have anything to do with not getting things done because you want them to be perfect. Perfectionists may even procrastinate less than the average person.

There is a quote that I have at the top of my “Important Reminders” list that helps me overcome procrastination,

“For every disciplined action there is a multiple reward.” ~ Jim Rohn

This quote  helps me break out of a cycle of procrastination because it reminds me that action will result in rewards — as opposed to inaction, which results in, well, nothing. Rewards or nothing? I choose rewards.

So if you are in the grip of procrastination today, just make an intention to mark one thing off your procrastination list. One thing leads to another, and pretty soon you’ll feel like you’re on top of your game again and reaping the rewards of your efforts.

Next week, I have another idea for you about how you can do a self-evaluation and break out of the procrastination rut with just 6 questions.

But for now, I’ll leave you with the following cartoon. I think it’s funny because it rings true for many of us. Leave a comment below, what’s your favorite flavor of procrastination? I have to admit – I tend to be a Sidetracker!

field_guide_to_procrastinators_20px

Image courtesy of 20px.com

Remembering an Accident: 1981 Louisville, Kentucky Sewer Explosion

Posted: February 21st, 2014 in Accidents

Aftermath-of-sewer-explosion.On February 13, 1981, a series of sewer explosions destroyed more than two miles of streets in Louisville, Kentucky. The explosions were caused by ignition of hexane vapors discharged from a Ralston-Purina soybean processing plant located near the University of Louisville.

The hexane leaked straight into the sewer system, where it spread into the lines under adjacent homes. It is a miracle that there were no fatalities. Ralston-Purina paid $18 million to the Louisville Metropolitan Sewer District and more than $8.9 million to 16,000 plaintiffs in a lawsuit.

View dramatic images of the Friday the 13th explosion and read more here.

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