Author Archives: Barb Phillips

Change the Course of your Career by Jumping in the Flow

Posted: July 22nd, 2015 in Career Development, Career Development Tips

Are you completely involved with the work you are doing in your career?

Do you feel a great inner clarity knowing what needs to be done?

Do you feel your skills are adequate for your tasks?

Do you frequently feel a sense of ecstasy in what you are doing or a sense of serenity?

Do hours fly by in minutes?

Do you feel part of something larger?

If you answer yes to the above, you have achieved an optimal state of “flow” at work.

Perhaps you work at a company that provides that type of environment. Did you know that the first “Purposes of Incorporation” of Sony when they didn’t have a dime was:

To establish a place of work where engineers can feel the joy of technological innovation, be aware of their mission to society, and work to their heart’s content.

Not quite there? Stay with this 19 minute video until the last few minutes and find out what is blocking you from being in the flow at work.  Find out which state you are in and what you can do to break out of it and into flow.

Continuing education is one way to get back into the flow of your career.

Contact Barb at phillips@taproot.com and find a course that will open options in your career development!

We Train Great Leaders

Posted: July 21st, 2015 in Career Development, Courses, TapRooT

Click the light gray box near the bottom right corner to view larger slideshow.

Why Caring About Your Work Matters

Posted: July 15th, 2015 in Career Development, Career Development Tips

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If you’ve had the opportunity to hear as many motivational coaches as we have at our Global TapRooT® Summit, one thing becomes clear:  Align your life with your highest aspiration, because it’s short and there are no do-overs. Time is a valuable resource so each day we need to ask ourselves, “Am I spending my time on something that really matters?”

This author brings this point home with some valuable lessons on why we should care about our work.  Read the article here:

The Case for Caring About Your Work

Perhaps when we interview candidates for positions within our company, we should be asking that question, “How will this position help you align your life with your goals?” Because a person who can clearly connect his or her job to achievement of personal life goals will most likely be a better performer.  And a person who has no goals may not be the best fit for your organization.

How else can we encourage others to take care and pride in their work to transform our workplaces?

Interviewing: Why Every Investigator Should Avoid These 3 Things

Posted: July 15th, 2015 in Root Cause Analysis Tips

When an employee is a witness to an incident that occurs in the workplace, what he or she witnessed becomes valuable information for evidence collection and finding and fixing the root causes.  Retrieval from memory is hard work, and when an interview is not set up properly, a witness will not remember important details.

The two short videos below are actors playing the role of interviewer and interviewee in a mock incident investigation interview for a General Motors incident investigation training module. They created one “good” interview, and one “bad” interview scenario.

Let’s take a quick look at the bad scenario, what not to do when interviewing.

Three mistakes to avoid:

  1. The interviewer did not communicate open, friendly body language during the greeting or try to “break the ice.” Notice that the interviewer appeared uninterested in the interviewee when she sat down, and he gestured with palms down which may convey to the interviewee that he already knows what happened. Soon thereafter, he actually says the words “I know what happened” and “I gotta ask you some questions so I can fill out this report.” At this point, the interviewee may feel like the interview is just a formality and he doesn’t need her information.  This mistake is a good way to completely shut the interviewee down right off the bat.
  2. The interviewer asked closed-ended, leading questions. “Was Larry wearing a seatbelt?”  “Was Larry speeding?” “Was Larry out partying again last night?” The interviewer put the interviewee on defense with this line of questioning.  Also, these questions are limited to a “yes” or “no” answer and will not elicit much information, and they are leading. The interviewer already told her “I know what happened” so she may have been afraid at this point to say “yes” or “no” because it may not be the same thing the interviewer “knows.”  Overall, interviewees want to provide good information so when interviewers lead them into thinking they already have “the right” information, the interviewees may doubt what they witnessed so they can also give “the right” answer.
  3. The interviewer does not set up the cognitive interview properly and interrupts constantly. Interrupting when an interviewee is delivering a narrative (i.e., telling the story as she remembers it) is the worst mistake an interviewer can make because it causes the interviewee to lose her train of thought and valuable information she may provide.  The interviewer has already made the mistake of assuming the principle role with his “I already know what happened” attitude so the interviewee will wait for him to ask specific questions without volunteering anything.  The interviewer also said “I only have a few questions here.” This makes the interviewee feel like he is in a hurry so she should keep her answers brief.

How the interview could be improved:

  1. Begin the interview with a friendly tone to develop rapport.  This includes open body language (smile, eye contact, open palms).  Tell the interviewee about the purpose of the interview (to find the root causes of the incident so they can be corrected and kept from occurring again).  If the interviewee was injured or witnessed a tragic accident, ask her how she is feeling or how she is doing since witnessing the accident.  Be human. Research proves that the amount of information an interviewee remembers changes based on the tone established during the first few minutes of the interview.
  2. Save closed-ended questions to follow-up something specific the interviewee said. When the interviewee is telling her story (the narrative) of the incident and a question pops into the interviewer’s mind about what she said, don’t interrupt.  After the witness gives her narrative, try open-ended questions before closing in on small details with closed-ended questions.  This will keep the interviewee in memory retrieval mode for a little longer.  The interviewer should write down questions and ask them after the interviewee has completely finished her narrative, and the questions should pertain to the narrative. For example, “You stated that you were on Workstation 3 when the incident occurred. Is that your normal workstation?”
  3. Set up the cognitive interview.  There are three steps to setting up a cognitive interview. The first step is to tell the interviewee explicitly to assume the principle role.  “I didn’t see the incident, so I’m relying on you to tell me what happened.”  The second step is to ask the interviewee for the narrative.  “Picture, in your mind’s eye, where you were right before the incident occurred.  Think about where you were standing, what you were thinking and feeling at the time. Get a clear picture of your surroundings.”  The third step is to ask the witness to report small details. “Tell me everything you remember about the incident no matter how trivial.”  Then don’t interrupt!

Let’s take a quick look at a “good” interview.

Keep in mind that these videos were recorded for training purposes.  A true cognitive interview would last longer than 3 minutes, but this is a good example of a few good techniques to use. Kudos to these two actors and their efforts to make our workplaces safer.

Comment below on the techniques the interviewer used that made this interview better than the first as well as any mistakes in the first video that were not discussed above.

For more information about how to conduct an investigative interview, attend our 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Training.

TapRooT® in Chile

Posted: July 8th, 2015 in Courses, TapRooT

Marco Flores

 

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Chile Wins Cup!

TapRooT® Instructor Marco Flores sent us this great photo from a recent course in Chile and reported that Chile recently won the America Cup in soccer for the first time in 105 years!

Congratulations to our Chilean friends!

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The #1 Reason Why You Aren’t Happy

Posted: July 8th, 2015 in Career Development, Career Development Tips

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Have you ever said:

I don’t have enough time to do all the things I want to do.

I feel uninspired in my career.

I’m not getting what I need from my relationships.

Have you ever wondered why, in spite of good intentions, things just never seem to work out?

I have some good news for you today.  It’s not because of bad luck.  It’s not because you’re too young or too old or too out of shape or too poor.  And stop beating yourself up for lack of motivation.  These problems are all related to one reason:  losing focus on your core values.

We don’t have time for all the things we want to do is because we don’t make important things that align with our core values a priority over all of the other things that distract us.

We feel uninspired in our careers because we are not choosing something that makes us feel excited to get up in the morning, and that something always aligns with our core values.

We don’t get what we need from our relationships because we lean too heavily on others who do not support or share our core values.

Core values have a huge impact on our lives because they give us purpose and direction.  One of the most popular Career Development posts on the Root Cause Analysis Blog is “5 Easy Steps to Determining and Living Your Core Values.” It is a simple exercise that reveals to us that core values are actionable items – that everything we do are either aligned with them or they are not.  Determine your core values here:

http://www.taproot.com/archives/33161

“What you seek is seeking you.” ~ Rumi

So after you determine your core values, what do you do with them?  How do core values help you live the life you’ve always felt meant to live?

Where it typically breaks down is when we don’t make the effort to align these values with our day-to-day lives.

Here are 3 important action items to implement once you decide to build your life on your core values.  When you make that intention, getting what you want from life will feel like less of a struggle, “luck” will seem to be in your favor, and motivation will come with ease.

  1. Review your core values frequently. Keep them in notes on your iPhone, on a Post-It on your bathroom mirror or any place you look often. It’s important to keep them in front of you daily so you remember what they are.   Fully understanding what they are and writing them down is wonderful, but if you do not review them daily, or at least weekly, you will find yourself slowly sailing away from all of the things you hold dear, and it will take a crisis to turn that ship around.
  2. Don’t make a major decision without examining them. Buying a house? Changing careers? Going back to school? Getting married? Buying a car? We allow other people and things to influence our decisions all the time when we really should be true to ourselves and align every big decision with our core values. For example, if one of your core values is to “live in freedom,” you will not want to purchase so many items on credit that you are living in bondage to debt.
  3. Take inventory of daily small decisions and determine if they fit with your core values. One easy way to stay on track is to mentally review the small decisions you make each day before falling asleep. Keeping a journal is helpful as well.  When your decisions don’t line up with your core values, you can get yourself back on track before venturing too far away from yourself. For example, if one of your core values is to “act with mindfulness” you may note that you were served a wonderful meal that day but was so distracted you really didn’t taste the food, or that a friend was sharing a story about her vacation and you were only half listening.

Living our core values is essential to living out our purpose in life and finding true meaning.  There is no greater gift we can give to the world or receive for ourselves than to honor our core values and live the life we are meant to live fully and with passion. Every home, workplace and city is an exciting place to be when it is full of those passionate about life.

I would like to hear about your core values, how they’ve been tested, and how they guide you through challenging times.

Learn How to Make Safe Behavior ‘Go Viral’ for a Great Safety Culture

Posted: July 7th, 2015 in Career Development

Clare Solomon and Mark Ormond invite you to learn how to make safe behavior ‘go viral’ for a great safety culture.

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International Culture Change Seminar – Creating a ‘Tipping Point’
September 17, 2015
Phoenix, Arizona
$250

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Clare Solomon

Mark Ormond

Mark Ormond

It was great to meet so many TapRooT® users at the Las Vegas Summit last month and to all those who got involved in our social experiment to create a Tipping Point – thank-you!

If you weren’t there, you missed a treat! We succeeded in getting almost 200 people up on their feet dancing, or tapping along to Simon and Garfunkel’s ‘Cecilia’… this was at 8.30 in the morning after a big night out in Vegas!

The tipping point… that magic moment when ideas, trends and social behavior cross a threshold, tip and spread like wildfire.
Malcolm Gladwell

So, what’s all this got to do with creating a great safety culture? It’s all about having 3 things:

1. the right people
2. the right message
3. … at the right time

Get this right and culture change can happen more quickly than you think. Just look at how fast behaviour can go viral, from a stadium wave to the ice bucket challenge!

Why do some messages stick?

As culture change specialists we have helped our clients see tipping points of change happen again and again through a powerful combination of coaching and communication tools designed to change attitudes, values and beliefs at every level of the organization.

In this seminar you will find out:

- The key elements required to influence a tipping point in your business
– How to create and sustain behavioural change that will lead to better safety performance.

On average our clients see a 30-50% improvement in incidents and accidents within 12 months.

Sign up to our Culture Change Seminar
September 17, 2105
Phoenix, Arizona
Call: 00 44 1494 782444
Email: Clare@hillsolomon.co.uk

Or click below to find out more and book your place…
http://hillsolomon.co.uk/latest-news/culture-change-seminar/

A highly professional, engaging and thought-provoking workshop. The presentation was smooth and demonstrated a deep understanding of the subject that has clearly delivered results. The event was expertly organised and facilitated.
James Pomeroy, Group HSE Manager
Senior plc

Root Cause Tip: What is the Root Cause of Memory Failure While Learning?

Posted: July 1st, 2015 in Root Cause Analysis Tips

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Ever take your laptop to training to take notes? According to psychological research, (The Pen is Mightier than the Keyboard), if you want to retain what you learn during training, using a laptop to take notes is not a good idea.

The research indicates that the act of taking notes on a laptop seems to interfere with our ability to remember the information. Mueller & Oppenheimer, psychologists for the research, believe that’s because learners on laptops are mindlessly typing everything the instructor is saying.  When tested, laptop users performed similar to pen notetakers on factual questions about the notes, but significantly worse on conceptual questions.

Since we can’t take notes as fast nor capture as much information with a pen, we are required to think and actively listen for what’s most important to write down.  Thus, we store information into memory as we think about it.

One of the root causes of memory failure during learning appears to be the way we take notes.  Will this research change the way you take notes in training?  Leave your comments below.

Happy Canada Day!

Posted: July 1st, 2015 in Pictures, TapRooT® Instructor

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We are grateful for all of our Canadian TapRooT® Instructors and friends! Happy Canada Day!

Career Development: On Information Overload? Take Action!

Posted: July 1st, 2015 in Uncategorized
breaking news

Interesting headlines can lead us to good information, but they also lead us away from taking action.

I admit to being an information junkie, and list article headlines steal my attention every single day because they are tasty morsels of knowledge I can’t resist knowing.

10 Things You Didn’t Know About …

15 Things You Need to Know About …

20 Things You Should Consider About …

You get the idea!

Not to say that information is a bad thing ….
but with the Internet we are all on information overload.  What happened to simply taking action?

I love this author’s idea about implementing a “deprivation week,” disconnecting from information sources and just doing the work you know you should be doing. If you feel like you are operating less successfully because of an overwhelm of information, check out his advice to quit learning and start doing: 10 Overlooked Truths about Taking Action

 

Career Development: The Truth About Failure

Posted: June 22nd, 2015 in Career Development, Career Development Tips, Pictures

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In Walter Bond’s book All Buts Stink (2009),  he puts failure into perspective.  He believes that there are two important factors that contribute to it – a lack of information and/or a lack of discipline.  Both contributing factors can be overcome.

You are already paying a price for the life you have. Pay a little bit more and have a bigger life. ~ Walter Bond

Reaching for a bigger life is to risk failure. Ironically, failure is easy to live with because it brings out sympathy from our friends and colleagues.  Sympathy is comforting.  We may not realize it, but there may be a point in life that we settled comfortably into the benefits of failure.  Discipline is hard work, and so is finding the information that we need to be successful.

However, accepting failure is also accepting a smaller life.

So how do you live a bigger life? Bond advises,

Career change, back to school, investment of time, investment of money, increased effort or focus, investment of courage.

And then what? And then the road to success may get uncomfortable, and one reason is that success brings out jealousy from those same friends and colleagues who were all in on the  group hug when we failed. They may send this message to us once we begin to experience success:  Don’t push forward and leave me behind. Stay here on my level where we’re friends.  They may not say those exact words, but what they do say to us may not encourage us to move toward a bigger life.  Plus, taking risks will create more obstacles, more roadblocks, more failures.

Perhaps the solution is to re-frame “failure” as simply an undesirable outcome.  Undesirable outcomes are not failures, they help us succeed.  To experience success after an undesirable outcome, we must be willing to take action.  We not only need a willingness to risk failure, we need to be willing to fall flat on our faces allowing that experience to motivate us to take that information and increase in action, to find the information we need, to become more disciplined.  Failure is a chance to move forward with important, new knowledge.

Know better. Do better.

Think of all the successful people throughout history, and all the struggles they went through before achieving a bigger life.  They never gave up — they corrected what needed to be corrected after each failure and kept their momentum.

When we become wildly successful, no one will be talking about our failures. Failures are just important and necessary stepping stones to achieving our highest aspirations.  Stepping stones … not stumbling blocks.  And that, friends, is the truth about failure.

Are you paying a price for the life you have? Are you willing to pay a little more?

Learn more about Walter Bond at http://walterbond.com/

Mystery Solved!

Posted: June 19th, 2015 in Pictures

Shout out to TapRooT® Instructor, Ken Turnbull for forwarding us this interesting, hot-off-the-press “headline news.”  You heard it here first!

 

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Are You Comfortable With Just Getting By?

Posted: June 15th, 2015 in Best Practice Presentations, Human Performance, Summit

Getting comfortable with just getting by, accepting failure, accepting broken rules … these attitudes all contribute to an unhealthy workplace culture that allows major and minor accidents. How do we get back on track?

We livestreamed Mark Paradies’ empowering talk, “How to Stop Normalization of Deviation,” at the 2015 Global TapRooT® Summit in Las Vegas. View the recorded session below and learn how to improve the work culture at your facility.

Broadcast live streaming video on Ustream

Dan Quiggle Shares Lessons on Leadership

Posted: June 3rd, 2015 in Summit

We were privileged to hear Dan Quiggle speak on leadership today at the 2015 Global TapRooT® Summit in Las Vegas.

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Dan Quiggle (left) Mark Paradies (right)

 

 

2015 Global TapRooT® Summit After Hours: Downtown Vegas!

Posted: May 25th, 2015 in Local Attractions, Summit

Are you getting packed for Vegas? Do you have one or two fun things on your list for after hours fun?

On our visit to downtown Vegas, we chatted with one of the locals who told us downtown is where it’s at!  It’s less expensive for a night out on the town, and in his opinion, more fun because it’s old-style Vegas glam!

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Hugo’s Cellar at the Four Queens Hotel and Casino is known for classic Las Vegas dining.  Ladies will be greeted with a long stemmed rose.

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Adventure seekers will love the thrill of ziplining through downtown.  Click this photo to view an exciting zipline video!

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The Golden Nugget and Binion’s sit right across from each other! Binion’s penthouse restaurant offers breathtaking views; and The Golden Nugget was named “Best Downtown Hotel” in 2014!

Last but not least, The Gold Spike has a giant living room and backyard where there is a ton of fun to be had on a warm summer night!

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The living room at the Gold Pike is equipped with games and comfy furniture (click to view another photo of the living room.

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Judy and I played life-size chess in the backyard of The Gold Spike! Click this image to see the cornhole games and comfy seating!

We’ve listed some more ideas on our Hotel & Travel page (scroll down the page to view the list).

Still haven’t signed up?  We’ll take your registration for a few more days!  Go to this link now: http://www.taproot.com/taproot-summit/register-for-summit

We are Grateful to Our Military

Posted: May 25th, 2015 in Uncategorized

Memorial Day

We just want to take a moment to honor those who have served, those who are active military, and the families of our military. Home of the free because of the brave. Thank you for your sacrifice.

Do You Have the Newest Editions of the TapRooT® Root Cause Dictionary, Root Cause Tree and Corrective Action Helper?

Posted: May 20th, 2015 in Courses, TapRooT, Training

2015 DuoCahA new revision of the TapRooT® Root Cause Dictionary, TapRooT® Root Cause Tree, and TapRooT® Corrective Action Helper Guide was released on May 1, 2015.  This revised 3-piece set is available for purchase to anyone who has attended a TapRooT® course.

Revisions include:

Root Cause Tree: One new root cause and 3 updated root causes.

Root Cause Dictionary: Updates to definitions to cover root cause changes and current industry best practices.

Corrective Action Helper Guide: Updates for new root causes and updated references.

The updated materials are currently available in English only.

Go here to order: http://www.taproot.com/store/2015-DUOCAH.html

**If you attended a course in 2015, contact info@taproot.com for a special discount.

***If you are attending the 2015 Global TapRooT® Summit, you can purchase all at the Summit at a special discount as well! Contact info@taproot.com for more information

Room Block Extended for the 2015 Global TapRooT® Summit!

Posted: May 14th, 2015 in Summit

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Our room block has been extended!  Friday, May 22, 2015, is your last opportunity to book a room in the 2015 Global TapRooT® Summit Hotel Block.

By staying at the conference hotel, you will enjoy the value, convenience and perks of residing at the conference venue, including:

  • Room block rates starting at just $129.00.
  • Excellent location (the Flamingo wasn’t built on the Strip, the Strip was build around the Flamingo)
  • Saving time – relax – have one more cup of coffee before the conference begins – your room is conveniently located in the conference host hotel.
  • Bars and nightlife, dining, entertainment, casino, salon and spa, shopping and a wildlife habitat – all onsite!
  • Step right out the door and onto the fabulous LINQ Promenade!

There’s no better place to stay during Summit week than the Flamingo Las Vegas!

For more information, visit: http://www.taproot.com/taproot-summit/hotel-travel

Passo a Passo No Site TapRooT® (Portuguese Step-by-Step Instructions to Register for TapRooT® Courses)

Posted: April 29th, 2015 in Courses

Thanks to TapRooT® Instructor, Boris Risnic, for providing these instructions for our Portuguese-speaking clients.

Incident Investigation & Root Cause Analysis Sessions Offered Exclusively June 3-5, 2015 in Las Vegas

Posted: April 29th, 2015 in Best Practice Presenters, Root Cause Analysis Tips, Summit, Summit Videos, Video Depot

Benna interviews Ken Reed, track leader for the 3-day Incident Investigation & Root Cause Analysis track at the 2015 Global TapRooT® Summit.

Attend this track for a deeper understanding of investigation and root cause analysis.

REGISTER for the 2015 Global TapRooT® Summit.

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