Author Archives: Barb Phillips

Monday Motivation: Leadership

Posted: July 24th, 2017 in Career Development, Career Development Tips, Wisdom Quote

“If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.” ~ John Quincy Adams

The authority of leadership is not something that someday you’ll deserve. It’s possible that you are not even aware of the biggest impact you’ve ever had on a person’s life. You are more powerful than you think! Be inspired with this six minute video.

Everyday Leadership via @TEDTalks

Friday Joke

Posted: July 21st, 2017 in Jokes

Interviewing and Evidence Collection Tip: The #1 mistake when collecting Paper evidence

Posted: July 20th, 2017 in Investigations, Root Cause Analysis Tips

 

In TapRooT®, we use a mnemonic to quickly remember what types of evidence we may want to collect after an incident occurs: 3 Ps & an R. This stands for:

People evidence
Paper evidence
Physical evidence and
Recording evidence.

Today we are going to discuss the #1 mistake investigators make when collecting Paper evidence. Paper evidence may include all sorts of things including:

  • regulatory paperwork
  • activity specific paperwork
  • personnel paperwork
  • policy and procedure paperwork and
  • equipment manuals.

What do you think the biggest mistake is when it comes to collecting Paper evidence… given all of the paper that we have in our workplaces?

The #1 mistake is: Collecting too much paper that is not relevant to the investigation!

You don’t need to collect every piece of paper at your facility. How do you know what you don’t need? By looking at your SnapCharT®! You need all the paper that supports your timeline of events and supports the facts.  If you use the TapRooT® software, you can easily upload .pdfs of this paperwork and highlight relevant pages in your report to management.

Don’t make the mistake of collecting so much paper that what you need for evidence is somewhere at the bottom of the stack. Use your SnapCharT® to guide you and keep your paper evidence organized in the TapRooT® software.

To learn more about evidence collection, join me in Houston, Texas in November for a 3-day root cause analysis and evidence collection course, or just 1 day of evidence collection training.

 

What does a bad day look like?

Posted: July 18th, 2017 in Accidents

 

It could look like this but objects may be closer than they appear.  Read the story behind this photo on the Times Colonist.

Monday Motivation: Don’t Buy Into the Myths!

Posted: July 17th, 2017 in Career Development, Career Development Tips, Wisdom Quote

 

Write down your goals!

Try to do your best!

Visualize success!

What’s wrong with these motivators? We’ve all heard them and probably said them to motivate others. Well, how are they working for you? This Psychology Today article discussed possible stumbling blocks to these motivators:

The 3 Biggest Myths About Motivation That Won’t Go Away

Friday Joke

Posted: July 14th, 2017 in Jokes

Interviewing and Evidence Collection Tip: 3 Goals for Packaging Physical Evidence

Posted: July 13th, 2017 in Investigations, Root Cause Analysis Tips

 

When it comes to packaging physical evidence during evidence collection, there are three distinct goals.

  1.  Protect employees from hazardous evidence.  There may be biohazards associated with the evidence being packaged or the evidence may have sharp edges that could harm an employee who tries to handle it.  Protecting employees from hazardous evidence is a consideration when packaging it.  Label the evidence to clearly warn anyone who handles it of the hazard.
  2. Protect the evidence.  Protect the evidence from loss, contamination or deterioration when packaging it.  This may include packing the evidence in a container that is not too large or small, drying the evidence before packing it if it is wet or storing it in proper temperature.
  3. Label the evidence properly. Labeling the evidence properly includes: a) a description of what is contained in the packaging; b) where it was when it was collected; c) chain of custody; d) a unique identifier, such as a number, so that it not confused with other evidence.

Packaging physical evidence is important to preserving it for the duration of the investigation.  With these three goals in mind, you’ll be off to a good start.

To learn more about evidence collection, join me in Houston, Texas in November for a 3-day root cause analysis and evidence collection course, or just 1 day of evidence collection training.

Thanks for joining me for this week’s tip!  See you next week!

 

What does a bad day look like?

Posted: July 11th, 2017 in Accidents

It looks like when the secret of happiness seems so close but is actually so far away.

Monday Motivation: 5 Sign that You are Coasting at Work

Posted: July 10th, 2017 in Career Development, Career Development Tips

Do co-workers always ask you for help? Do they never ask you for help? Are you often on the receiving end of passive-aggressive comments? Are you chafing under micromanagement? Are you no longer “in the loop” about important projects?

This sounds like a list of things that would motivate you to look for career opportunities elsewhere. But before you do that, you need to consider whether or not you’re bringing it on yourself. These tips from “The Muse” may help!

Read: 5 Signs You’re Not Pulling Your Weight at Work (And People Know It)

Friday Joke

Posted: July 7th, 2017 in Jokes

Interviewing and Evidence Collection Tip: Interviews are Valuable People Evidence

Posted: July 6th, 2017 in Investigations, Root Cause Analysis Tips

Evidence collected from interviews is an important component of evidence collection.

Evidence collected from interviews is an important component of evidence collection.

In TapRooT®, we use a mnemonic to quickly remember what types of evidence we may want to collect after an incident occurs: 3 Ps & an R. This stands for:

People evidence
Paper evidence
Physical evidence and
Recording evidence.

When people think about evidence collection, sometimes they focus on paper evidence (such as collecting policies, procedures, permits, HR records), physical evidence (such as collecting broken equipment and fluid samples), or recording evidence (such as taking or collecting photographs and videos).  They don’t always think of interviewing as evidence, and in spite of the fact that this weekly column is called “Interviewing and Evidence Collection,” interviewing is evidence collection.

Most of the time in a workplace incident investigation, the majority of the evidence will come from people evidence, especially interviews. Often, evidence collection will start there and guide the investigator to collect other types of evidence.

People evidence includes information about those involved with the incident as well as information from those who may not have been there but may have knowledge to provide (example: an expert witness).

We’ve spent a lot of time developing the TapRooT™ 12-Step Interview Process which is a very effective method of getting both quality and quantity of information from an interviewee. This technique is taught in both our 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Training and our 1-Day Effective Interviewing and Evidence Collection Techniques Course.

Today, we want to offer you some free resources to help you collect valuable people evidence through interviews:

Video:  The Cognitive Interview

Video: How to Interpret Body Language

Top 3 Worst Practices in Root Cause Analysis Interviewing

Thanks for joining me for this evidence collection tip.  See you next week!

What does a bad day look like?

Posted: July 4th, 2017 in Accidents

A bad day is when you plan a nice family picnic, but this is the only picnic table available.

Friday Joke: Multi-tasking

Posted: June 30th, 2017 in Jokes

You can sometimes do this in July in Tennessee. And, hey, it’s better than “new car smell.”

Monday Motivation: A Better Workday (in Less than Ten Minutes!)

Posted: June 26th, 2017 in Wisdom Quote

“As I’ve always said,” Robbins said, “If you don’t have 10 minutes, you don’t have a life.”

We highlighted how what we think affects our success a couple of weeks ago, and this post is in line with that.  However, today we are highlighting tips you can easily put into practice. Tony Robbins has a quick formula for that and it will only take 9 minutes of your day.  It includes gratitude, solving obstacles, and visualizing the things you want to happen in your life.

Learn about it here:  The 9 Minute Morning Meditation Tony Robbins Swears By

Interviewing and Evidence Collection Tip: How to Package Physical Evidence

Posted: June 21st, 2017 in Investigations, Root Cause Analysis Tips

Hello and welcome to this week’s column focused on interviewing and evidence collection for root cause analysis of workplace incidents and accidents.  We refer to four basic categories of evidence in our Interviewing & Evidence Techniques training:

  1. People
  2. Paper
  3. Physical
  4. Recordings

Some investigations only require evidence that does not need special packaging such as training records, policies and procedures (paper evidence) and/or interviews of the people who were there (people evidence). While a workplace investigation is not the same as a criminal investigation where physical evidence often requires forensic examination, there are definitely situations where collecting physical evidence is helpful to the root cause investigation.  Here are a few basic tips:

Packaging: Most physical evidence can be stored in paper containers, like envelopes and boxes. There is a plethora of websites that sell packaging material designed specifically for evidence. Wet evidence (such as fabric) should be air dried before packaging because moisture causes rapid deterioration and risks environmental contamination, like mold.   Allow wet evidence to dry thoroughly and then package it. Then store the evidence at room temperature. If the item is not wet and does not need to “breathe” (for example, the evidence is a collection of bolts), you can also use plastic containers for storage.

Sharp objects:  Package sharp objects in a way to ensure the safety of those handling it.  Packaging may include metal cans, plastic or hard cardboard boxes so long as the object will not protrude.

Size: Ensure the packaging is of adequate size. If the packaging is too small for the item, it may fail over time.  If it’s too large, it could become damaged when it moves around the container.

Avoid using staples to seal evidence envelopes:  Staples can damage the evidence.  Tape across the entire flap of an envelope to seal it.

Don’t forget to tag and mark evidence containers so that you will be able to easily identify what is stored in each container at a later date.

If you’re interested in learning more about Interviewing & Evidence Collection, I hope you will join me in Houston, Texas in November for a 3-day root cause analysis + interviewing and evidence collection course or 1-day  interviewing and evidence collection training.

What does a bad day look like?

Posted: June 20th, 2017 in Accidents

It looks like when Aunt Carol shows up.

Friday Joke: Which book are you reading from?

Posted: June 16th, 2017 in Jokes

Even better: which book is your boss reading from?

(Credit: John Deckmann)

Flint Water Crisis: 5 Michigan Officials Charged with Involuntary Manslaughter

Posted: June 15th, 2017 in Accidents, Investigations

 

Yesterday, five Michigan officials were charged with involuntary manslaughter related to the Flint, Michigan water crisis. Recall that in 2014, Flint switched its water source from Detroit to the Flint River in part to save money. It didn’t take long before residents noticed a difference in the way their water tasted and smelled.  The water caused some residents to get life-threatening Legionnaires disease and the medical community identified higher levels of lead in children’s blood (this type of exposure to lead can lead to developmental issues).

Learn more on NPR.

News stories like this are tragic because they are avoidable.  TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis shifts thinking from ineffective blame to effective solutions.  TapRooT® can be used proactively too to avoid these types of devastating problems from ever happening.

Learn more in our 2-day or 5-day root cause analysis courses.

 

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