Category: Career Development

3 Characteristics that Separate Leaders from Managers

July 29th, 2015 by

pablo(26)

.

A manager and a leader have two very different yet critical roles for the success of every business. It is extremely rare to find an individual who can serve both roles.

It may seem intuitive to know which role you’re in, but sometimes a manager will find himself miserable in a position because he is a leader, and a leader doing a manager’s job is like trying to fit a round peg into a square hole.

Knowing whether you are a leader or a manager helps you fit into the organizational structure of your company, and benefits both you and the company.

Here are three primary differences between and manager and a leader:

 

Manager: You’ve been told you’re the “brains of the business.”

Leader: You’ve been told you “inspire action” with your ideas.

Manager: You set exciting goals, i.e., how many green widgets will be produced and sold this week.

Leader: You respectfully question exciting goals, i.e., is the sale of green widgets in line with our company’s core values?

Manager: You major in the “how” and “when,” establishing systems, operating procedures and incentive programs.

Leader: You major in the “what” and “why,” establishing the mission statement, long-term vision, and the direction of the company.

People ask the difference between a leader and a boss. The leader leads and the boss drives. ~ Theodore Roosevelt

While it’s true that some managers inspire and some leaders can create great systems, these are not their primary strengths.

Have you ever left a position because you were managing instead of leading, or vice versa?

Do you consider yourself an investigative team leader? We’d love to see you in our 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Training!  Check out our Global Schedule for a course near you!

Change the Course of your Career by Jumping in the Flow

July 22nd, 2015 by

Are you completely involved with the work you are doing in your career?

Do you feel a great inner clarity knowing what needs to be done?

Do you feel your skills are adequate for your tasks?

Do you frequently feel a sense of ecstasy in what you are doing or a sense of serenity?

Do hours fly by in minutes?

Do you feel part of something larger?

If you answer yes to the above, you have achieved an optimal state of “flow” at work.

Perhaps you work at a company that provides that type of environment. Did you know that the first “Purposes of Incorporation” of Sony when they didn’t have a dime was:

To establish a place of work where engineers can feel the joy of technological innovation, be aware of their mission to society, and work to their heart’s content.

Not quite there? Stay with this 19 minute video until the last few minutes and find out what is blocking you from being in the flow at work.  Find out which state you are in and what you can do to break out of it and into flow.

Continuing education is one way to get back into the flow of your career.

Contact Barb at phillips@taproot.com and find a course that will open options in your career development!

We Train Great Leaders

July 21st, 2015 by

Click the light gray box near the bottom right corner to view larger slideshow.

Why Caring About Your Work Matters

July 15th, 2015 by

pablo(6)

If you’ve had the opportunity to hear as many motivational coaches as we have at our Global TapRooT® Summit, one thing becomes clear:  Align your life with your highest aspiration, because it’s short and there are no do-overs. Time is a valuable resource so each day we need to ask ourselves, “Am I spending my time on something that really matters?”

This author brings this point home with some valuable lessons on why we should care about our work.  Read the article here:

The Case for Caring About Your Work

Perhaps when we interview candidates for positions within our company, we should be asking that question, “How will this position help you align your life with your goals?” Because a person who can clearly connect his or her job to achievement of personal life goals will most likely be a better performer.  And a person who has no goals may not be the best fit for your organization.

How else can we encourage others to take care and pride in their work to transform our workplaces?

The #1 Reason Why You Aren’t Happy

July 8th, 2015 by

pablo(12)

Have you ever said:

I don’t have enough time to do all the things I want to do.

I feel uninspired in my career.

I’m not getting what I need from my relationships.

Have you ever wondered why, in spite of good intentions, things just never seem to work out?

I have some good news for you today.  It’s not because of bad luck.  It’s not because you’re too young or too old or too out of shape or too poor.  And stop beating yourself up for lack of motivation.  These problems are all related to one reason:  losing focus on your core values.

We don’t have time for all the things we want to do is because we don’t make important things that align with our core values a priority over all of the other things that distract us.

We feel uninspired in our careers because we are not choosing something that makes us feel excited to get up in the morning, and that something always aligns with our core values.

We don’t get what we need from our relationships because we lean too heavily on others who do not support or share our core values.

Core values have a huge impact on our lives because they give us purpose and direction.  One of the most popular Career Development posts on the Root Cause Analysis Blog is “5 Easy Steps to Determining and Living Your Core Values.” It is a simple exercise that reveals to us that core values are actionable items – that everything we do are either aligned with them or they are not.  Determine your core values here:

http://www.taproot.com/archives/33161

“What you seek is seeking you.” ~ Rumi

So after you determine your core values, what do you do with them?  How do core values help you live the life you’ve always felt meant to live?

Where it typically breaks down is when we don’t make the effort to align these values with our day-to-day lives.

Here are 3 important action items to implement once you decide to build your life on your core values.  When you make that intention, getting what you want from life will feel like less of a struggle, “luck” will seem to be in your favor, and motivation will come with ease.

  1. Review your core values frequently. Keep them in notes on your iPhone, on a Post-It on your bathroom mirror or any place you look often. It’s important to keep them in front of you daily so you remember what they are.   Fully understanding what they are and writing them down is wonderful, but if you do not review them daily, or at least weekly, you will find yourself slowly sailing away from all of the things you hold dear, and it will take a crisis to turn that ship around.
  2. Don’t make a major decision without examining them. Buying a house? Changing careers? Going back to school? Getting married? Buying a car? We allow other people and things to influence our decisions all the time when we really should be true to ourselves and align every big decision with our core values. For example, if one of your core values is to “live in freedom,” you will not want to purchase so many items on credit that you are living in bondage to debt.
  3. Take inventory of daily small decisions and determine if they fit with your core values. One easy way to stay on track is to mentally review the small decisions you make each day before falling asleep. Keeping a journal is helpful as well.  When your decisions don’t line up with your core values, you can get yourself back on track before venturing too far away from yourself. For example, if one of your core values is to “act with mindfulness” you may note that you were served a wonderful meal that day but was so distracted you really didn’t taste the food, or that a friend was sharing a story about her vacation and you were only half listening.

Living our core values is essential to living out our purpose in life and finding true meaning.  There is no greater gift we can give to the world or receive for ourselves than to honor our core values and live the life we are meant to live fully and with passion. Every home, workplace and city is an exciting place to be when it is full of those passionate about life.

I would like to hear about your core values, how they’ve been tested, and how they guide you through challenging times.

Learn How to Make Safe Behavior ‘Go Viral’ for a Great Safety Culture

July 7th, 2015 by

Clare Solomon and Mark Ormond invite you to learn how to make safe behavior ‘go viral’ for a great safety culture.

tipping point

International Culture Change Seminar – Creating a ‘Tipping Point’
September 17, 2015
Phoenix, Arizona
$250

Clare_Solomon

Clare Solomon

Mark Ormond

Mark Ormond

It was great to meet so many TapRooT® users at the Las Vegas Summit last month and to all those who got involved in our social experiment to create a Tipping Point – thank-you!

If you weren’t there, you missed a treat! We succeeded in getting almost 200 people up on their feet dancing, or tapping along to Simon and Garfunkel’s ‘Cecilia’… this was at 8.30 in the morning after a big night out in Vegas!

The tipping point… that magic moment when ideas, trends and social behavior cross a threshold, tip and spread like wildfire.
Malcolm Gladwell

So, what’s all this got to do with creating a great safety culture? It’s all about having 3 things:

1. the right people
2. the right message
3. … at the right time

Get this right and culture change can happen more quickly than you think. Just look at how fast behaviour can go viral, from a stadium wave to the ice bucket challenge!

Why do some messages stick?

As culture change specialists we have helped our clients see tipping points of change happen again and again through a powerful combination of coaching and communication tools designed to change attitudes, values and beliefs at every level of the organization.

In this seminar you will find out:

- The key elements required to influence a tipping point in your business
– How to create and sustain behavioural change that will lead to better safety performance.

On average our clients see a 30-50% improvement in incidents and accidents within 12 months.

Sign up to our Culture Change Seminar
September 17, 2105
Phoenix, Arizona
Call: 00 44 1494 782444
Email: Clare@hillsolomon.co.uk

Or click below to find out more and book your place…
http://hillsolomon.co.uk/latest-news/culture-change-seminar/

A highly professional, engaging and thought-provoking workshop. The presentation was smooth and demonstrated a deep understanding of the subject that has clearly delivered results. The event was expertly organised and facilitated.
James Pomeroy, Group HSE Manager
Senior plc

Career Development: The Truth About Failure

June 22nd, 2015 by

success failure

In Walter Bond’s book All Buts Stink (2009),  he puts failure into perspective.  He believes that there are two important factors that contribute to it – a lack of information and/or a lack of discipline.  Both contributing factors can be overcome.

You are already paying a price for the life you have. Pay a little bit more and have a bigger life. ~ Walter Bond

Reaching for a bigger life is to risk failure. Ironically, failure is easy to live with because it brings out sympathy from our friends and colleagues.  Sympathy is comforting.  We may not realize it, but there may be a point in life that we settled comfortably into the benefits of failure.  Discipline is hard work, and so is finding the information that we need to be successful.

However, accepting failure is also accepting a smaller life.

So how do you live a bigger life? Bond advises,

Career change, back to school, investment of time, investment of money, increased effort or focus, investment of courage.

And then what? And then the road to success may get uncomfortable, and one reason is that success brings out jealousy from those same friends and colleagues who were all in on the  group hug when we failed. They may send this message to us once we begin to experience success:  Don’t push forward and leave me behind. Stay here on my level where we’re friends.  They may not say those exact words, but what they do say to us may not encourage us to move toward a bigger life.  Plus, taking risks will create more obstacles, more roadblocks, more failures.

Perhaps the solution is to re-frame “failure” as simply an undesirable outcome.  Undesirable outcomes are not failures, they help us succeed.  To experience success after an undesirable outcome, we must be willing to take action.  We not only need a willingness to risk failure, we need to be willing to fall flat on our faces allowing that experience to motivate us to take that information and increase in action, to find the information we need, to become more disciplined.  Failure is a chance to move forward with important, new knowledge.

Know better. Do better.

Think of all the successful people throughout history, and all the struggles they went through before achieving a bigger life.  They never gave up — they corrected what needed to be corrected after each failure and kept their momentum.

When we become wildly successful, no one will be talking about our failures. Failures are just important and necessary stepping stones to achieving our highest aspirations.  Stepping stones … not stumbling blocks.  And that, friends, is the truth about failure.

Are you paying a price for the life you have? Are you willing to pay a little more?

Learn more about Walter Bond at http://walterbond.com/

Connect with Us

Filter News

Search News

Authors

Barb PhillipsBarb Phillips

Editorial Director

Chris ValleeChris Vallee

Six Sigma

Dan VerlindeDan Verlinde

Software Development

Dave JanneyDave Janney

Safety & Quality

Ed SkompskiEd Skompski

Medical

Gabby MillerGabby Miller

Communications Specialist

Ken ReedKen Reed

Equifactor®

Linda UngerLinda Unger

Vice President

Mark ParadiesMark Paradies

Creator of TapRooT®

Steve RaycraftSteve Raycraft

Technical Support

Success Stories

In 1995, BellSouth Telecommunications noticed an increase in the number of service interruptions or outages…

Bell South

The healthcare industry has recognized that improved root cause analysis of quality incidents…

Good Samaritan Hospital
Contact Us