Category: Current Events

Monday Accident & Lessons Learned: Fatigue

September 26th, 2016 by

Here is a link (click of picture below) to a Callback publication about accidents and Fatigue …

Fatigue Callback

Here is a quote:

“The NTSB 2016 “Most Wanted List” of Transportation Safety Recommendations leads with, ‘Reduce Fatigue-Related Accidents.” It states, “Human fatigue is a serious issue affecting the safety of the traveling public in all modes of transportation.’”

Monday Accident & Lessons Learned: Overspeed at Fletton Junction

September 19th, 2016 by

This incident notice is from the UK Rail Investigation Branch about an overspeed incident at Fletton Junction, Peterborough on 11 September 2015.

At around 17:11 hrs on 11 September 2015, the 14:25 hrs Virgin Trains East Coast passenger train service from Newcastle to London King’s Cross passed through Fletton Junction, near Peterborough at 51 mph (82 km/h) around twice the permitted speed of 25 mph (40 km/h). This caused the carriages to lurch sideways resulting in minor injuries to three members of staff and one passenger.

It is likely that the train driver had forgotten about the presence of the speed restriction because he was distracted and fatigued due to issues related to his family. Lineside signs and in-cab warnings may have contributed to him not responding appropriately as he approached the speed restriction and engineering controls did not prevent the overspeeding. Neither Virgin Trains East Coast, nor the driver, had realised that family-related distraction and fatigue were likely to be affecting the safety of his driving. Virgin Trains East Coast route risk assessment had not recognised the overspeeding risks particular to Fletton Junction and Network Rail had not identified that a speed limit sign at the start of the speed restriction was smaller than required by its standards.

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The incident could have had more serious consequences if the train had derailed or overturned. The risk of this was present because the track layout was designed for a maximum speed of 27 mph (43 km/h).
As a consequence of this investigation, RAIB has made five recommendations. Two addressed to Virgin Trains East Coast relate to enhancing the management of safety critical staff with problems related to their home life, and considering such issues during the investigation of unsafe events.

A recommendation addressed to Virgin Trains East Coast and an associated recommendation addressed to Network Rail relate to assessing and mitigating risks at speed restrictions.

A further recommendation to Network Rail relates to replacement of operational signage when this is non-compliant with relevant standards.

RAIB report also includes learning points relating to managing personal problems that could affect the safety performance of drivers. A further learning point, arising because of a delay in reporting the incident, stresses the importance of drivers promptly reporting incidents which could have caused track damage. A final learning point encourages a full understanding of the effectiveness of safety mitigation provided by infrastructure and signalling equipment.

For more information see:

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Monday Accident & Lessons Learned: Baby Dies After Oxygen Mix-Up at Hospital in Australia

September 12th, 2016 by

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Here’s a link to the story: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-07-25/baby-dies-at-bankstown-lidcombe-hospital-after-oxygen-mix-up/7659552

An Oxygen line had been improperly installed in 2015. It fed nitrous oxide to a neonatal resuscitation unit rather than oxygen.

The Ministry of Health representative said that all lines in all hospitals in New South Wales installed since the Liberal government took over in 2011 will be checked for correct function. 

What can you learn from this?

Think about your installation and testing of new systems. How many Safeguards are in place to protect the targets?

Mark Paradies to Speak on Tuesday at the 2016 FDA/PDA Regulatory Conference

September 11th, 2016 by

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Mark Paradies will be talking about root cause analysis at the 2016 Parenternal Drug Associations / Federal Drug Administration Joint Regulatory Conference in Washington, DC, on Tuesday. See page 8 (Session A3) at:

https://www.pda.org/docs/default-source/website-document-library/conferences/2016/pda-fda-joint-regulatory-conference/agenda.pdf

See you there!

 

Monday Accident & Lessons Learned: Freight train collision near Logan, UK

September 5th, 2016 by

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From the UK Rail Accident Investigation Branch

On 1 August 2015 at about 11:11 hrs, a freight train travelling within a work site collided with the rear of a stationary freight train at 28 mph (45 km/h).

Engineering staff had authorised the driver of the moving freight train to enter the work site at New Cumnock station, travel about 3 miles (4.8 km) to the start of a track renewal site, and bring the train to a stand behind the stationary train.

There were no injuries but the locomotive and seven wagons from the moving train and eleven wagons from the stationary train were derailed; the locomotive and derailed wagons were damaged. One wagon came to rest across a minor road. There was also substantial damage to the track on both railway lines.

The immediate cause was that the moving train was travelling too fast to stop short of the rear of the stationary train when its driver first sighted the train ahead. This was due to a combination of the train movement in the work site not taking place at the default speed of 5 mph (8 km/h) or at caution, as required by railway rules, and the driver of the moving train believing that the stationary train was further away than it actually was.

An underlying cause was that drivers often do not comply with the rules that require movements within a work site to be made at a speed of no greater than 5 mph (8 km/h) or at caution.

As a consequence of this investigation, RAIB has made four recommendations addressed to freight operating companies.

One relates to the monitoring of drivers when they are driving trains within possessions and work sites.
Two recommendations relate to implementing a method of formally recording information briefed to drivers about making train movements in possessions and work sites.

A further recommendation relates to investigating the practicalities of driving freight trains in possessions and work sites for long distances at a speed of 5 mph (8 km/h) or at other slow speeds, and taking action to address any identified issues.

RAIB has also identified three learning points including:

the importance of providing drivers with all of the information they need to carry out movements in possessions and work sites safelya reminder to provide drivers (before they start a driving duty) with information about how and when they will be relievedthe importance of engineering staff giving instructions to drivers through a face to face conversation when it is safe and practicable to do so.

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Monday Accident & Lessons Learned: Passenger Trapped & Dragged by Train

August 29th, 2016 by

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From the Rail Accident Investigation Branch …

At around 13:10 hrs on 25 July 2015, a passenger was dragged along the platform at Hayes & Harlington station, London, when the 11:37 hrs First Great Western service from Oxford to London Paddington departed while her hand was trapped in a door. The passenger, who had arrived on the platform as the doors were about to close, had placed her hand between the closing door leaves.

The train driver did not identify that the passenger was trapped and the train moved off, dragging the passenger along the platform. After being dragged for about 19 metres, the passenger lost her footing and fell onto the platform. The passenger suffered head, hand and back injuries.

RAIB’s investigation found that the passenger had deliberately placed her hand in the closing door in the expectation that it would re-open as a consequence. RAIB has concluded that after closing the doors of the train, the driver either did not make a final check that it was safe to depart, or that the check was insufficiently detailed to allow him to identify the trapped passenger. The driver may have been misled into thinking that it was safe to depart because a door interlock light in his cab had illuminated, indicating that the doors were closed and locked and he was able to take power.

Our investigation identified that the train driver and other railway staff held the same misunderstanding: if someone had a hand trapped in a door it would not be possible for the door interlock light to illuminate and a driver to take power. This is not the case, and the door was found to be compliant with all applicable standards after the accident.

As a consequence of this investigation, RAIB has made two recommendations.
The first, addressed to RSSB to review, and if necessary extend, its research into the passenger/train interface to understand passenger behaviour and identify means for deterring members of the public from obstructing train doors.

The second recommendation is addressed to operators and owners of trains similar to the one involved in the accident at Hayes & Harlington, is intended to continue and expand upon a current review into the practicability of fitting sensitive door edge technology to this type of train.
RAIB has also identified three learning points. The first concerns improving awareness among train drivers of the limitations of train door interlocking technology and the importance of the final safety check when dispatching a train.

The second concerns the potential for drivers to be distracted by the use of mobile communication devices while driving.

The third is aimed at train operators to have the necessary processes in place to identify drivers who are showing signs of sub-standard performance or not engaging positively with measures agreed as part of a Competence Development Plan and the provision of briefing and guidance material for driver managers to enable them to identify behaviours and attitudes which are inconsistent with those expected of train drivers.

For the complete report, see:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/577395aded915d622c0000c9/R122016_160630_Hayes_and_Harlington.pdf

Monday Accident & Lessons Learned: CORROSION COUPON PLUG EJECTED FROM PRESSURIZED PIPELINE

August 22nd, 2016 by

The following is a IOPG Safety Alert from the International Association of Oil & Gas Producers…

IOGP SAFETY ALERT

CORROSION COUPON PLUG EJECTED FROM PRESSURISED PIPELINE

Target audience:

Personnel accountable or responsible for pipelines and piping fitted with corrosion coupons.

What happened:

A routine corrosion coupon retrieval operation was being conducted on a 28” crude oil pipeline. Two retrieval technicians were located in a below ground access pit, to perform the operation. The operation involved removal of the corrosion coupon carrier ‘plug’ from its threaded 2” access fitting on the pipeline. The plug was ejected at high velocity from the access fitting (pipeline pressure 103 bar), during the operation to ease the plug using a ring spanner to a maximum of ¼ turn (as per procedure) and before the service valve and retrieval tool were installed. A high volume of crude oil spilled from the pipeline via the access fitting. Fortunately, the two technicians escaped the access pit without injury from the plug projectile or crude oil release.

What Went Wrong?

The Venture is still in the process of conducting the incident investigation. Based on their findings to date, the most probable cause is that the threads of the access fitting were worn down to such an extent, that they were unable to restrain the plug upon minor disturbance (the ¼ turn of the plug).

  • The access fitting was installed during pipeline construction in 1987. It is estimated to have been subject to over 140 coupon retrieval and installation cycles.
  • Bottom-of-pipeline debris can cause galling of threads on stainless steel plugs, which in turn can damage the threads of carbon steel access fittings.
  • The repair (chasing) of worn threads on access fittings is performed using an original equipment manufacturer supplied thread tap assembly service tool.
  • In the presence of bottom-of-pipeline debris and thread damage, the repetitive removal of internal thread material, can lead to ever smaller contact surfaces, increasing contact stress, increasing wear rates and/or galling.
  • Smaller thread contact surfaces reduce the ability of the access fittings to restrain plugs.
  • In this incident, the original equipment manufacturer supplied thread tap assembly service tool had been used routinely for every plug coupon retrieval and installation cycle without the use of flushing oil to remove debris from the threads.

Corrective Actions and Recommendations:

Lessons Learned –

  • As yet, there is no standard method to determine internal thread condition of on-line corrosion probe/coupon original equipment manufacturer access fittings. Thread condition is not easily inspected.
  • The risk posed by long term use of thread tap assembly service tools on access fittings, has not been previously identified.

Action taken in originating company –

Temporarily suspend all corrosion coupon retrieval operations on pressurised lines furnished with threaded access fittings in the 6 o’clock position (bottom of pipeline). This provides time to complete the investigation and complete work with the original equipment manufacturer to develop clear guidance on the maximum number of retrieval cycles.

  • A subsequent notification will be issued based on the completed investigation and original equipment manufacturer tests*. In this alert any changes to guidance or maintenance routines (i.e. how and when these type operations can be recommenced) will be advised.
  • The temporary suspension does not cover retrieval operations on lines which are depressurised.

* the use of ‘no go’ gauges for checking access fittings after every use of a thread tap assembly service tool or access fitting body seat reamer, is being explored.

Disclaimer

Whilst every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, neither the IOGP nor any of its members past present or future warrants its accuracy or will, regardless of its or their negligence, assume liability for any foreseeable or unforeseeable use made thereof, which liability is hereby excluded. Consequently, such use is at the recipient’s own risk on the basis that any use by the recipient constitutes agreement to the terms of this disclaimer. The recipient is obliged to inform any subsequent recipient of such terms.This document may provide guidance supplemental to the requirements of local legislation. Nothing herein, however, is intended to replace, amend, supersede or otherwise depart from such requirements. In the event of any conflict or contradiction between the provisions of this document and local legislation, applicable laws shall prevail.

Safety Alert Number: 273 

IOGP Safety Alerts http://safetyzone.iogp.org

Mark Paradies Receives Ordo Honoris Award

August 16th, 2016 by

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The Kappa Delta Rho Fraternity presented Mark Paradies, President of System Improvements with the Ordo Honoris Award for device to his fraternity and the world. Part of this service to the world was Mark’s development and teaching of the TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis System to save lives, improve product quality, and improve workplace productivity by finding and fixing the root causes of accidents and incidents.

Congratulations Mark!

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Monday Accident & Lessons Learned: Five Items To Remember When Using a Checklist

August 15th, 2016 by

Another great article from NASA’s Aviation Safety Reporting System that applies to a much broader audience than just aviation folks. If you use checklists, there something to be learned from this article. Click on the picture of the article below to read more…

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Monday Accident & Lessons Learned: Simple Human Error – Safeguards – Weight and Balance Issues

August 8th, 2016 by

The errors reported in this Aviation Safety Reporting System “Call Back” article are simple but serious. If you load a plane wrong, it could crash on takeoff. Click on the picture of the article below to read the whole report.

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These simple errors seem like they are just an aviation problem. But are there simple errors that your people could make that could cause serious safety, quality, or production issues? maybe a Safeguard Analysis is in order to see if the only Safeguard you are relying on could fail due to a simple human error.

Monday Accident & Lessons Learned: Is the Information Collected as Part of an Accident Investigation “Privileged” – Canadian Court Rules

August 1st, 2016 by

The Occupational Health and Safety Act (“OHS Act”) in Canada requires an employer to conduct and investigation and prepare a report following an accident in the workplace. But an Aberta Queens Bench ruled that the obligation does not “foreclose or preclude” the employer’s ability to claim privilege over information collected during an internal investigation into the incident.

Want to learn more? See the article about the Alberta v Suncor Energy case at:

http://www.mondaq.com/canada/x/495040/Health+Safety/Court+Of+Queens+Bench+Confirms+That+Privilege+May+Apply+To+Workplace+Accident+Investigation

Monday Accident & Lessons Learned: Human Error That Should Not Occur

July 25th, 2016 by

This Accident shares a “Call Back” Report from the Aviation Safety Reporting System that is applicable far beyond aviation.

In this case, the pilot was fatigued and just wanted to “get home.” He had a “finish the mission” focus that could have cost him his life. Here’s an excerpt:

I saw nothing of the runway environment…. I had made no mental accommodation to do a missed approach as I just knew that my skills would allow me to land as they had so many times in past years. The only conscious control input that I can recall is leveling at the MDA [Rather than continuing to the DA? –Ed.] while continuing to focus outside the cockpit for the runway environment. It just had to be there! I do not consciously remember looking at the flight instruments as I began…an uncontrolled, unconscious 90-degree turn to the left, still looking for the runway environment.

To read about this near-miss and the lessons learned, see:

http://asrs.arc.nasa.gov/docs/cb/cb_436.pdf

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Monday Accident & Lessons Learned: Freight Train Derailment in the UK – Three New Recommendations

July 18th, 2016 by

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Derailment of freight train near Angerstein Junction, south east London, 3 June 2015

At about 12:10 hrs on 3 June 2015, one wagon of an empty freight train derailed on the approach to Angerstein Junction, near Charlton in south east London. The train continued over the junction, derailing two further wagons, before it stopped on the Blackheath to Charlton line. The three derailed wagons were partly obstructing the line used by trains travelling in the opposite direction. No other trains were involved in the accident and no-one was injured, but there was significant damage to the railway infrastructure.

The wagons derailed because the leading right-hand wheel on one of them was carrying insufficient load to prevent the wheel climbing up the outer rail on a curved section of track. The insufficient load was due to a combination of the suspension on that wheel being locked in one position, a twisted bogie frame and an intended twist in the track.

As a consequence of this investigation, RAIB has made three recommendations.

The first, addressed to VTG (the wagon owner), seeks improvements to its wagon maintenance processes.

The second, also addressed to VTG, seeks liaison with industry to improve understanding of how wagon suspension wear characteristics relate to maintenance processes.

The third, addressed to Network Rail, seeks a review of infrastructure arrangements at the accident location.

The report also includes a learning point reinforcing a previous recommendation intended to encourage use of currently available wheel load data to enable identification of wagons with defects or uneven loads that are running on Network Rail’s infrastructure.

To see the complete report, go to:

https://assets.digital.cabinet-office.gov.uk/media/5748532b40f0b60366000016/R102016_160601_Angerstein_Junction.pdf

The above information and report are from the UK Rail Accident Investigation Branck. See their web site at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/rail-accident-investigation-branch

Great People Coming to the 2016 Global TapRooT® Summit

June 29th, 2016 by

I just went through the attendance list for the 2016 Global TapRooT® Summit and I was impressed. What a great bunch of people we are having come together in San Antonio!

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For me, as President of System Improvements and one of the creators of the TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis System, the Summit always seems like old home week or a high school reunion. I get to see some of our clients that have been working hard to save lives, improve quality, and keep their companies from getting a black eye.

We’ve been doing these Summits since 1994 and you might not believe it but, I’ve been learning new and valuable stuff at the Summit every year. 

So for all of you coming to the 2016 Global Summit,

I CAN’T WAIT TO SAY “HOWDY!”

And get caught up on what you have been doing to make the world a better place.

And for those who haven’t signed up yet,

GET HOT!

The Summit is just about a month away (August 1-5). You need to get approval, get registered, and get your travel scheduled.

What? You don’t know why you should attend? You need the knowledge shared at the Summit to …

SAVE LIVES

SAVE YOUR COMPANY $$$

IMPROVE QUALITY

OPTIMIZE ASSETS

Those are business critical topics that you need to make your company best in class.

See the Summit brochure at:

 http://www.taproot.com/taproot-summit

See the Summit agenda at:

http://www.taproot.com/taproot-summit/summit-schedule

If you need more convincing, let me plead with you to attend. Watch this video…

Mark Paradies invites you to the 2016 Global TapRooT® Summit from TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis on Vimeo.

Is “Ordering” Improvements Enough?

June 27th, 2016 by

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Can command and control improve safety?

According to this ABC article,  Chinese government has “ordered” improvements in safety. Yet 11 people died in an accident at an Aluminum Corp. of China aluminum plant when equipment they were dismantling fell on them. The article also mentions the chemical explosion that killed 173 people in the port city of Tianjin last year.

What are you doing to improve safety?

Can you or your management “order” improvements?

Perhaps you need to learn root cause analysis and best practices and skills to make your safety program world class?

If you want next year to be better than this year, sign up for the 2016 Global TapRooT® Summit in San Antonio, Texas, on August 1-5.

Pick the advanced course that will help you learn the skills you need to to improve your company’s performance.

Then pick the best practice sharing sessions at the Summit that will help you meet the biggest challenges that face your company.

Learn from your peers from around the world (see the LIST here).

Learn from people in your industry and other industries (see the LIST here).

And don’t forget our Summit GUARANTEE:

Attend the Summit and go back to work and use what you’ve learned. If you don’t get at least 10 times the return on your investment, simply return the Summit materials and we’ll refund the entire Summit fee.

With a guarantee like this one, you have nothing to lose and everything to gain!

Monday Accident & Lessons Learned: Derailment at Godmersham, Kent, UK

June 27th, 2016 by

 

 

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Here’s a summary of the report from the UK Rail Accident Investigation Branch about a derailment at Godmersham, UK:

 

“At around 21:40 hrs on 26 July 2015, a passenger train derailed after striking eight cows that had gained access to the railway at Godmersham in Kent, between Wye and Chilham stations. There had been a report of a cow on the railway an hour earlier, but a subsequent examination by the driver of the next passing train did not find anything. There were no further reports from other trains that passed before the accident occurred.

 

The train involved in the accident was travelling at 69 mph (111 km/h) at the point of impact. There were 67 passengers on board plus three members of staff; no injuries were reported at the time of the accident. Because the train’s radio had ceased to work during the accident, the driver ran for about three-quarters of a mile towards an oncoming train, which had already been stopped by the signaller, and used its radio to report the accident.

 

The accident occurred because the fence had not been maintained so as to restrain cows from breaching it, and because the railway’s response to the earlier report of a cow on the railway side of the fence was insufficient to prevent the accident. In addition, the absence of an obstacle deflector on the leading unit of the train made the derailment more likely.

 

As a result of this accident, RAIB has made five recommendations addressing the fence inspection process, clarification of railway rules in response to reports of large animals within the boundary fence, the fitting of obstacle deflectors to rolling stock (two recommendations), and the reliability of the train radio equipment.

 

RAIB has also identified two learning points for the railway industry, relating to the railway’s response to emergency situations, including the response to reports of large animals within the boundary fence and the actions to take following an accident.

Here is a link to read the report…

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Monday Accident & Lessons Learned: Collision between a tram and a pedestrian, Manchester

June 20th, 2016 by

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The UK Rail Accident Investigation Branch published a report about a tram hitting a pedestrian in Manchester, UK.

A summary of the report says:

At about 11:13 hrs on Tuesday 12 May 2015, a tram collided with and seriously injured a pedestrian, shortly after leaving Market Street tram stop in central Manchester. The pedestrian had just alighted from the tram and was walking along the track towards Piccadilly.

The accident occurred because the pedestrian did not move out of the path of the tram and because the driver did not apply the tram’s brakes in time to avoid striking the pedestrian.

As a result of this accident, RAIB has made three recommendations. One is made to Metrolink RATP Dev Ltd in conjunction with Transport for Greater Manchester, to review the assessment of risk from tram operations throughout the pedestrianised area in the vicinity of Piccadilly Gardens.

A second is made to UK Tram, to make explicit provision for the assessment of risk, in areas where trams and pedestrians/cyclists share the same space, in its guidance for the design and operation of urban tramways.

A further recommendation is made to Metrolink RATP Dev Ltd, to improve its care of staff involved in an accident.

For the complete report, see:

https://assets.digital.cabinet-office.gov.uk/media/5705107640f0b6038500004d/R062016_160412_Market_Street.pdf

 

What does a bad day look like?

June 7th, 2016 by

For one mom, it looked like her vacation cruise ship pulling away from the dock without her but with her children on it.

Lesson learned:  Don’t miss the boat.


Read story.

Monday Accident & Lessons Learned: The Cost of an Accident – BP Pays Out $56 Billion So Far

May 23rd, 2016 by

The Wall Street Journal announced that BP incurred $56 Billion in expenses from the Deepwater Horizon explosion and spill. And the end is still not in sight.

BP’s CFO said “It’s impossible to come up with an estimate [of future costs].”

Of course, those costs don’t include the lives lost and the negative PR that the company has received. 

How much is a best in class process safety program worth? As BP’s CFO says …

It’s impossible to come up with an estimate.

If you would like to learn best practices to improve your safety performance and make your programs “best in class,” the at ten the 2016 Global TapRooT® Summit in San Antonio, Texas, on August 1-5.

What? You say YOUR COMPANY CAN’T AFFORT IT? Can it afford $56 Billion? The investment in your safety program is a pittance compared with the costs of a major accident. Your company should put spending on safety improvement BEFORE other investments … especially in difficult times.

If you are a senior manager, don’t wait for your safety folks to ask to attend the Summit. Send them an e-mail. Tell them you are putting a team together to attend the Summit with you to learn best practices to prevent major accidents. Ask them who would be the best people to include on this team. Then get them all registered fot the Summit.

Remember, the Summit is GUARANTEED

GUARANTEE

Attend the Summit and go back to work and use what you’ve learned.
If you don’t get at least 10 times the return on your investment,
simply return the Summit materials and we’ll refund the entire Summit fee.

Wow! A guaranteed ROI. How can we be so sure that you will return to work with valuable ideas to implement? Because we’ve been hosting these Summits for over 20 years and we know the “best of the best” attend the Summit and we know the value of the ideas they share each year. We’ve heard about the improvements that Summit attendees have implemented. Being proactive is the key to avoiding $56 Billion dollar mistakes.

So don’t wait. Get your folks registered today at:

http://www.taproot.com/taproot-summit/register-for-summit

Will public shaming lead to better safety?

May 12th, 2016 by

This is old news to most (or should be) but OSHA finally published the long awaited rule on injury reporting:

https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/finalrule/index.html

So now that information will become more public will companies improve their records to stay out of view? Some things to think about:

*If they did not care about worker’s safety before, why would they care now?
*Will anyone even pay attention?
*Will management put more pressure on the operation to reduce rates?
*Will management give the operation additional resources to accomplish it?
*Will the media misuse the information? Will it be used politically?
*Did you just become your PR Department’s best bud or worst enemy?
*Will it actually help companies choose better business partners? (many companies have been requiring rates during the RFP process anyway)
*Is everyone else in the organization now throwing in their 2 cents on how you run your business?

I look at this a few ways:

*If you already have a good program and record, this should be of little concern to you from the public information standpoint.
*Assuming that is the case, as a former corporate safety manager, I see this as a HUGE cost for companies to comply. But there has been (and still is) plenty of time to get things in place.

At the end of the day, you cannot control regulations. But can you control your injuries? You bet.

Two of the best ways to lower your injury rates? Do better investigations and audits. Why not join us for a future course? You can see the schedule and enroll HERE

ATF Says West Fertilizer Explosion Was a Criminal Act

May 11th, 2016 by

The explosion at the West Fertilizer Plant was thought to have been a tragic accident. However, the Associated Press has reported that the Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms, and Explosives Agency (ATF) has said that the fire that caused the explosion was “intentionally set.”

Here is a TV report link:

http://livestream.com/KXXV/live

Monday Accident & Lessons Learned: Will Criminal Charges Make Actors Safer?

May 9th, 2016 by

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Harrison Ford was hit by a heavy, hydraulically operated door while filming the new Star Wars movie. He suffered a broken leg. The UK Health & Safety Executive charged Foodles Productions (UK) Ltd. with four criminal violations and the company will have it’s first court hearing on May 12th.

Now the question – or lesson learned …

  • Will criminal charges make movie actors safer? 
  • Do studios already have incentives to keep their actors safe?

What do you think? Leave your comments here…

Another Fort McMurray Video

May 8th, 2016 by

This video has a few four letter words so turn your sound off if you would be offended … but the footage is spectacular.

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