Category: Pictures

Monday Accident & Lessons Learned: Freight Train Derailment in the UK – Three New Recommendations

July 18th, 2016 by

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Derailment of freight train near Angerstein Junction, south east London, 3 June 2015

At about 12:10 hrs on 3 June 2015, one wagon of an empty freight train derailed on the approach to Angerstein Junction, near Charlton in south east London. The train continued over the junction, derailing two further wagons, before it stopped on the Blackheath to Charlton line. The three derailed wagons were partly obstructing the line used by trains travelling in the opposite direction. No other trains were involved in the accident and no-one was injured, but there was significant damage to the railway infrastructure.

The wagons derailed because the leading right-hand wheel on one of them was carrying insufficient load to prevent the wheel climbing up the outer rail on a curved section of track. The insufficient load was due to a combination of the suspension on that wheel being locked in one position, a twisted bogie frame and an intended twist in the track.

As a consequence of this investigation, RAIB has made three recommendations.

The first, addressed to VTG (the wagon owner), seeks improvements to its wagon maintenance processes.

The second, also addressed to VTG, seeks liaison with industry to improve understanding of how wagon suspension wear characteristics relate to maintenance processes.

The third, addressed to Network Rail, seeks a review of infrastructure arrangements at the accident location.

The report also includes a learning point reinforcing a previous recommendation intended to encourage use of currently available wheel load data to enable identification of wagons with defects or uneven loads that are running on Network Rail’s infrastructure.

To see the complete report, go to:

https://assets.digital.cabinet-office.gov.uk/media/5748532b40f0b60366000016/R102016_160601_Angerstein_Junction.pdf

The above information and report are from the UK Rail Accident Investigation Branck. See their web site at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/rail-accident-investigation-branch

TapRooT® Around the World: Summit Refresher Course in Santiago

July 13th, 2016 by

Another successful Onsite Course in Santiago at ENAP.

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Interested in an Onsite Course for your company? Inquire today!

TapRooT® Around the World: Onsite Course in Chile

July 11th, 2016 by

TapRooT® had a great Onsite Course recently in Bio Bio, Chile.

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Inquire today about an Onsite Course for your company!

TapRooT® Around the World: Onsite Course in Chile

July 8th, 2016 by

TapRooT® was in Con Con, Chile for an Onsite training course.

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Send an inquiry today about an Onsite Course for your company!

What does a bad day look like?

July 7th, 2016 by

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Happy Birthday!

Rickover Quote… About his famous interview techniques ,,,

July 7th, 2016 by

Rickover talking about his famous candidate interviews …

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How Far Away is Death?

July 6th, 2016 by

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From Jim Whiting, one of our Australian instructors.

Monday Accident & Lessons Learned: WELL CONTROL EVENT WHEN USING AN MPD SYSTEM

July 4th, 2016 by

IOGP SAFETY ALERT

WELL CONTROL EVENT WHEN USING AN MPD SYSTEM

A High Pressure exploration gas-condensate bearing reservoir section was being drilled using automated Managed Pressure Drilling (MPD) and Rig Pump Divertor (RPD) equipment. Total gas and Connection Gas (TG/CG) peaks were noted the day before during drilling so the degasser was run. The drilled stand was backreamed at normal drilling flow rate prior to taking a MWD survey, making a connection and then taking Slow Circulating Rates (SCRs) on all 3 mud pumps. During taking SCRs an initial pit gain of 16bbl was noticed and reported.

It was suspected that pit gain was continuing, so a dynamic flow check was carried out in which it was confirmed that the well was flowing. Subsequently the well was shut in on the BOP (SICP=5,800psi, SIDPP=0psi). Dual float valves behind the bit were holding; total pit gain was estimated at 306bbls. Due to high casing pressure/MAASP concerns, an attempt was made to lower the annulus casing pressure by bleeding off gas through the choke and ‘poor boy’ mud-gas separator (MGS). This attempt was quickly aborted due to inadequate choke control leading to loss of the MGS liquid seal (SICP=7,470psi, SIDPP=0psi (floats holding).

After mobilization of high pressure bleed down facilities, the casing pressure was successfully reduced to zero psi through the “Lubricate and Bleed” well control method.

What Went Wrong?

During “pump off” events the Bottom Hole Pressure (BHP) dropped below Pore Pressure (Po) which resulted in initial small influxes into the wellbore. These were not recognized and therefore not reported as and when they occurred.

In MPD-RPD mode, fluid density dropped below the setpoint of 16.6 ppg (0.86 psi/ft) during pump off events (first and second survey and connections) due to a ‘sluggish’ RPD auto-choke. The RPD system had not been properly calibrated and the choke not run in the optimum position for effective control.

The formation pressure gradient of the gas-condensate bearing reservoir was evaluated to be 0.84psi/ft (Po~13,950psi).

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Corrective Actions and Recommendations:

  • Comprehensive and clear communication and action protocols (eg. close-in) should be tested, and verified as effective, across all Crews and Shifts.
  • Drillers must be clear that immediately on detecting an influx, they need to shut-in the well (applies for both MPD and non-MPD operations). The deployment of MPD does not change this basic principle.
  • Choke drills (A/B Crews and Day/Night shifts), including operation of remote choke(s) through a remote choke control panel, are critical to verifying that the total system (equipment, procedures, people including actions and communication protocols) are effective to operate the chokes against the maximum anticipated casing pressure.

Safety Alert Number: 272 

IOGP Safety Alerts http://safetyzone.iogp.org/

Disclaimer

Whilst every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, neither the IOGP nor any of its members past present or future warrants its accuracy or will, regardless of its or their negligence, assume liability for any foreseeable or unforeseeable use made thereof, which liability is hereby excluded. Consequently, such use is at the recipient’s own risk on the basis that any use by the recipient constitutes agreement to the terms of this disclaimer. The recipient is obliged to inform any subsequent recipient of such terms.

This document may provide guidance supplemental to the requirements of local legislation. Nothing herein, however, is intended to replace, amend, supersede or otherwise depart from such requirements. In the event of any conflict or contradiction between the provisions of this document and local legislation, applicable laws shall prevail.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Friday Joke: Communications NI

July 1st, 2016 by

Husband: What can I do to hep make dinner?

Wife: Take this bag of potatoes, peel half of them, and put them in the pot.

RESULT

 

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TapRooT® Around the World

June 30th, 2016 by

Here’s an inside look at the Onsite Course being taught at Cenovus this week.

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Interested in an Onsite Course for your company? Click here to inquire.

Want to attend a Public Course instead? Click here for a full list.

What does a bad day look like?

June 28th, 2016 by

For the cow…

 

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But imagine the guy who was on the ladder!

Monday Accident & Lessons Learned: Derailment at Godmersham, Kent, UK

June 27th, 2016 by

 

 

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Here’s a summary of the report from the UK Rail Accident Investigation Branch about a derailment at Godmersham, UK:

 

“At around 21:40 hrs on 26 July 2015, a passenger train derailed after striking eight cows that had gained access to the railway at Godmersham in Kent, between Wye and Chilham stations. There had been a report of a cow on the railway an hour earlier, but a subsequent examination by the driver of the next passing train did not find anything. There were no further reports from other trains that passed before the accident occurred.

 

The train involved in the accident was travelling at 69 mph (111 km/h) at the point of impact. There were 67 passengers on board plus three members of staff; no injuries were reported at the time of the accident. Because the train’s radio had ceased to work during the accident, the driver ran for about three-quarters of a mile towards an oncoming train, which had already been stopped by the signaller, and used its radio to report the accident.

 

The accident occurred because the fence had not been maintained so as to restrain cows from breaching it, and because the railway’s response to the earlier report of a cow on the railway side of the fence was insufficient to prevent the accident. In addition, the absence of an obstacle deflector on the leading unit of the train made the derailment more likely.

 

As a result of this accident, RAIB has made five recommendations addressing the fence inspection process, clarification of railway rules in response to reports of large animals within the boundary fence, the fitting of obstacle deflectors to rolling stock (two recommendations), and the reliability of the train radio equipment.

 

RAIB has also identified two learning points for the railway industry, relating to the railway’s response to emergency situations, including the response to reports of large animals within the boundary fence and the actions to take following an accident.

Here is a link to read the report…

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What Countries Will Be Represented at the 2016 Global TapRooT® Summit?

June 23rd, 2016 by

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Here’s a partial list …

  • Australia
  • Brazil
  • Canada
  • Colombia
  • Ecuador
  • Iraq
  • Jordan
  • Kenya
  • Mexico
  • New Zealand
  • Philippines
  • Qatar
  • Russia
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Senegal
  • Singapore
  • Trinidad
  • United Kingdom
  • USA

That’s why we call the Summit a GLOBAL Summit. Every continent is represented.

Sing up for the 2016 Global TapRooT® Summit now and learn best practices from around the world. Register at:

http://www.taproot.com/taproot-summit/register-for-summit

And find out about all the great sessions and keynote speakers by visiting the Summit web site at:

http://www.taproot.com/taproot-summit

What is a “Trend”???

June 22nd, 2016 by

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Have you ever had an accident and someone in management says …

That looks like a bad trend to me.

And you didn’t think it was but you couldn’t prove him wrong?

Have you ever had a regulator tell you that you have problems that look like an adverse trend and you didn’t know how to respond?

Have you ever wondered if a slight improvement in safety statistics is really significant?

Have you ever wondered how long it will take without a significant accident until you can say that performance really has improved?

Have you ever presented trend data and hoped that nobody asked any real questions because you were just making stuff up?

IF YOU DON’T LIKE YOUR ANSWERS TO ANY OF THESE QUESTIONS, you need to attend the TapRooT® Advanced Trending Techniques Pre-Summit Course in San Antonio, TX, on August 1-2.

We only offer this course once a year and anyone interested in learning how to trend safety statistics should attend.

Register at:

http://www.taproot.com/store/2-Day-TapRooT-R-Advanced-Trending-Techniques-Course.html

Who Could You Network With at the 2016 Global TapRooT® Summit?

June 22nd, 2016 by

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Who would you like to network with if you were going to share best practices and learn how others have solved problems?

The TapRooT® Summit is a great place to meet industry leaders.

Here a partial list of companies that have signed people up for the 2016 Summit:

  • Agrium
  • Air Liquide
  • Arizona Public Service
  • Ashplundh
  • Avangrid Renewables
  • Balitmore Gas & Electric
  • Barrick
  • California Resources
  • Chevron
  • CHS
  • ConocoPhillips
  • Duke Energy
  • Enerplus
  • Exelon
  • Exxon
  • FirstEnergy
  • Formosa Plastics
  • GE
  • Genetech
  • Hallam-ICS
  • Intergen
  • Lawrence Berkeley national Lab
  • Liberty Carton Company
  • Marathon
  • Matrix Services
  • Monsanto
  • Nalco Champion
  • National Grid
  • Northern Star Generation
  • NRG Energy
  • Nuclear Fuel Services
  • Occidental
  • Oceaneering
  • PCS Nitrogen
  • Prarie State Generation
  • Pratt & Whitney
  • PSH JV
  • Red Cedar Gathering
  • Sacramento Municipal Utility District
  • Saudi Aramco
  • Siemens
  • Siltronic
  • SNOLAB
  • Teranga Gold
  • Tuscon Electric
  • US Well Services
  • United Technologies
  • Valspar
  • Vancouver Airport Authority
  • Weatherford
  • Westar Energy
  • Willbros

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What are some of the job titles of people attending the 2016 Summit?

  • Airside Safety Officer
  • Area HSE Manager
  • Compliance Specialist
  • Corporate ESH Director
  • Corporate HSE Manager
  • Corrective Action Program Manager
  • Director of Corporate Safety
  • EHS Engineer
  • Electrical Engineer
  • Emergency Management Manager
  • Engineering Superintendant
  • Environmental Steward
  • Facility Manager
  • Global H&S Advidor
  • HSE Regional Leader
  • HSE Director
  • HSE Specialist
  • HSE Supervisor
  • Human Performance Specialist
  • Industrial Hygienist
  • Industrial Operations manager
  • Issue Management Program Leader
  • Lead Production Supervisor
  • Loss Prevention System Advisor
  • Manager, H&S
  • Mechanical Engineer
  • Operational Excellence Manager
  • Operations Staff
  • PDM Coordinator
  • Process Safety Manager
  • PSM Specialist
  • QHSE Leader
  • Quality Auditor
  • Quality Manager
  • Quality Systems Auditor
  • RCA Leader
  • RCA Manager
  • Refining Consultant
  • Reliability Specialist
  • Results Supervisor
  • Risk Manager
  • Safety & Training Specialist
  • Safety Associate
  • Safety Specialist
  • SHE Supervisor
  • SHEQ Divisional Manager
  • Site CAP Manager
  • Sr. Director, Serious Injury & Fatality Prevention
  • Sr. Safety Analyst
  • Staff Compliance Specialist
  • Supervisor Training
  • Team Leader H&S
  • Training Director
  • Training Specialist
  • Upstream HSE Team Lead
  • Vice President, HSE
  • VP & Regional Manager
  • VP HSE
  • WMS Advisor
  • Work Week Coordinator

And those are just partial lists!

Imagine the things you could learn and the contacts you could make.

Add your company and your job title to the list by registering at:

 http://www.taproot.com/taproot-summit/register-for-summit

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