Category: Quality

What makes a great root cause system?

September 5th, 2018 by

What makes a great root cause system?

That’s a question that I started researching back in 1985. What would I say is the answer to that question 33 years later? Here are some of my best ideas…

1. Guides Investigators: The root cause system needs to guide investigators to the real, fixable root causes of human performance and equipment reliability problems. Most root cause system don’t do this. Cause-and-effect, 5-Whys, fishbone diagrams, Why Trees, and Fault Trees all require someone on the team to know the right answer. This is especially troublesome when it comes to human error because most investigators have not been trained in human factors. Thus they are guessing at the causes of human error.

2. No Blame: Blame is probably one of the biggest obstacles to finding the causes of incidents. If people think that the outcome of an investigation will be blame, you won’t get their full and free cooperation. You will start having mystery incidents where no one knows what caused the problem. In fact, you might get the Bart Sympson response:

Bart simpson I didnt

That doesn’t lead to a great root cause analysis.

Some root cause systems actually have “blame categories.” (See this LINK.) Other people think that blame makes sense. (See this LINK.) But in TapRooT®, you look for causes – not blame. And if someone did something on purpose (sabotage or horseplay), you find it using the system and rule out other causes.

3. What Happened: You have to understand what happened BEFORE you can understand why it happened. That’s why I see many people adding a “time line” to the use of 5-Whys. If you don’t understand the sequence of events, you can’t understand the causes of what went wrong. A thorough understanding of “What happened?” is a must for great root cause analysis.

4. Consistency: If two different teams performed the root cause analysis would they find the same root causes? many root causes systems fall short here. The analysis depends on who is on the team. And it often depends on the conclusions the investigators reach before the investigation starts. Sometimes people just set out to find their favorite causes. They are consistent … but a different team may have different favorite causes.

5. New Ideas: Does your root cause system stimulate new ideas to solve problems? It should. It should provide investigators with guidance to help people fix the root causes they find.

6. A System: You root cause analysis tool is not enough unless it is a system. A set of tools designed for a purpose. There should be a process with steps and tools to use to achieve those steps.

7. Flexibility: You should be able to use your root cause system for simple incidents or major accidents. That’s a test of the system’s flexibility. You can’t afford to train people on two systems (one for simple incidents and one for major accidents). And even if you can, you will have to get them practiced in multiple systems (which is difficult).

8. Promotes Trending: You should use the data from your root cause analysis system to understand performance and spot trends. Does your system have a built in categorization that is designed to promote accurate trending?

9. Management Understands: Your system has to be understood by your management. In fact, it should be designed so that the end result is a east-to-undertand management presentation. One that explains what happened, what cause the problems, and what we need to do to stop future incidents.

10. Great Training: What good is a great root cause analysis system if you don’t have great training to get people to understand and use the system? You may want to inquire about the number of trainers and their experience. Can they support you around the world?

11. Proven Effective: Has the system been proven to be effective by users around the world? Do the have success stories from around the globe? Reference that you can believe?

12. Software Support: Does the system have effective software that makes the system even easier to use? Can that software be tied to other systems (safety or quality software)?

13. Continuously Improved: Is the system being continuously improved? What are the plans for future improvements?

That’s a pretty thorough list. What system meets all those criteria? The TapRooT® Root Cause System. Talk to us about all of these advantages that the TapRooT® System can bring to your company.

CLICK HERE to contact us and get more information.

Intelex and TapRooT® Partner to Offer In-Depth Root Cause Analysis

August 14th, 2018 by

In this video, hear about TapRooT®’s recent partnership with Intelex Technologies, a leading global provider of cloud-based Environmental, Health, Safety and Quality (EHSQ) management software. The integration of Intelex Technologies with TapRooT® allows customers to enter an injury in Intelex, perform a detailed root cause analysis using TapRooT®, and capture the result of the root cause analysis within Intelex. Customers are able to leverage Intelex’s powerful reporting and analytics foresight on injury and root cause data, ultimately producing better decisions and reducing the risk of repeat incidents, injuries and illnesses. The integration will also remove the administrative and record keeping hassle of managing two disparate incident and root cause analysis tools.

About the partnership, TapRooT®’s Vice President and Chief Technology Officer Dan Verlinde said, “We’re excited to establish a partnership with Intelex. TapRooT® and Intelex both create safer work places and help companies achieve operational excellence—that’s why this was an obvious opportunity to collaborate. This partnership will allow our joint customers to realize an integrated Environmental Health and Safety and Root Cause Analysis solution, while reducing duplicate effort.” And, Kristen Duda, Vice President, Strategic Alliances and Partnerships at Intelex, observed of the new integration, “This partnership provides customers with an industry-leading, integrated solution for taking their injury and root cause analysis data to the next level. By leveraging Intelex and TapRooT®, customers can drive impactful proactive safety decisions.”

Connect with us on Wednesdays for TapRooT®’s Facebook Live:

Where? https://www.facebook.com/RCATapRooT/

What Time? Noon Eastern | 11:00 a.m. Central | 10:00 a.m. Mountain | 9:00 a.m. Pacific

Do your own investigation into our courses and discover what TapRooT® can do for you; contact us or call us: 865.539.2139.

Save the date for our upcoming 2019 Global TapRooT® Summit, March 11-15, 2019, in the Houston, Texas, area at La Torretta Lake Resort.

How Does the FDA Decide What Facilities to Inspect?

July 24th, 2018 by

The FDA uses a site selection model (SSM) based on FDASIA section 705. Here is the model …

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So what can you do to reduce your FDA inspection frequency? Have better performance!

First, with better quality performance you will have less compliance issues – the first criteria.

Second, with better quality performance you will have less recalls – the second criteria.

Third, with better quality performance you will have a better inspection history – the fourth criteria.

Thus, by improving quality performance, you will reduce the resources required to deal with FDA inspections.

How do you have better quality performance?

One major factor is the quality of your root cause analysis and CAPA program.

TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis can help your facility achieve excellence in root cause analysis and have a world-class CAPA program.

For more about TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis Training, see:

http://www.taproot.com/courses

Winners and Losers in Healthcare’s Shift to Value-Based Payments

July 9th, 2018 by

 

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The 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) was established to shift payment away from the volume of services provided toward the quality of those services. The ACA directed the Department of Health and Human Services to create a budget neutral payment model. CMS (Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services) published an ACA fact sheet in 2015 that can be found here.

What does budget neutral mean in this case? A very smart healthcare executive explained it to me.  She said that budget neutral means you will have losers and you will have winners. The Department of Heath and Human Services had to put a payment model in place that takes money away from the losers and gives it to the winners so Medicare doesn’t see an increase in costs but still incentivizes providers to focus on quality. If you don’t have positive outcomes, money will be taken away and given to the providers that do show positive outcomes (the winners). So the difference between winners and losers is the quality of their outcomes. TapRooT® should be the quality improvement process healthcare organizations use to ensure they are on the winning side by improving quality and safety which also protects their revenue and margins. To find out more how your organization can improve your outcomes and protect your reimbursement, please contact me at marcus.miller@taproot.com.

Ever have trouble with root cause analysis during batch production with impurities?

July 6th, 2018 by

We received the question below in our TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis Users & Friends Group on LinkedIn, please join the discussion with your experiences and best practices.

How would one do a SnapCharT® for intermittent product quality issues that span weeks/months?

The only way to detect the product impurity is to use the product. Even so, the impurity seems random in the same batch or lot, at different weeks or months, with different upstream raw material suppliers, with different personnel. Past root cause analysis was not systematic enough to find the rc. Fixes did not solve.

Joint Commission Focuses Surveys to Assess Safety Culture

June 26th, 2018 by

 

 

Healthcare is catching up to other industries that have strong continuous improvement programs like mining, gas and oil. Joint Commission is leading that charge by implementing survey process improvements this month for how it assesses the safety culture in hospitals and critical access hospitals.  These improvements will be implemented for all other programs by October of this year. See this article for more details: (Read article.) Continuous Quality Improvement has become a major focus for payers.

In addition, the value-based payment model is replacing the fee for service payment model faster than anticipated. Healthcare organizations must find a comprehensive continuous quality improvement process for patient safety and to strengthen clinical and financial outcomes. Healthcare organizations must protect their revenue by limiting the financial impacts of poor clinical outcomes through a strong continuous quality improvement program. Survival is at stake. Medicare sequestration and payment penalties can easily erase already slim margins.

TapRooT® is that comprehensive continuous quality improvement process that Joint Commission or State Survey teams love to see as part of your QAPI program. TapRoot® trains safety, compliance and quality teams on complete investigation/auditing techniques, finding why incidents occur and identifying the root cause of those mistakes, errors or failures, identifying and implementing corrective actions and ensuring they are effective. TapRooT® has remarkable software that guides teams through the process and helps create impressive reports for management or survey teams.

If you would like to learn more to decide if TapRooT® is the right continuous quality improvement process for your organization, you can contact me at marcus.miller@taproot.com.

 

 

QAPI and TapRooT®: The Bridge to Operational Excellence and Quality Care in our Nursing Homes

June 1st, 2018 by

 

TapRooT® and QAPI

 

The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) defines QAPI as the coordinated application of two mutually reinforcing aspects of quality management systems:  Quality Assurance (QA) and Performance Improvement (PI) = QAPI.  Every nursing home in the U.S. is required to have a well documented QAPI program to be compliant with the Affordable Care Act.  Nursing homes are required to continuously identify and correct quality deficiencies as well as sustain performance improvements.

TapRooT® is used to identify root causes of potential and actual risk to quality performance and prescribes corrective actions that will eliminate the risk or significantly reduce risk and consequences of incidents.  TapRooT® training, tools and software are perfect solutions to implementing and maintaining a strong, compliant QAPI program.   

Let’s first look at the QA portion of QAPI.  QA is defined by CMS as the specification of standards for quality of service and outcomes, and a process throughout the nursing home for assuring that care is maintained at acceptable levels in relation to those standards.  QA is ongoing, both anticipatory and retrospective in it’s efforts to identify how the organization is performing, including where and why facility performance is at risk or has failed to meet standards.  TapRooT® processes ensure specification of standards by prescribing proven best practices for the root cause of any problem affecting quality of service, outcomes or breakdown of processes that assure  quality of care.  TapRooT® training, tools and software ensure the real root cause is identified by honing the teams’ skill in auditing and investigations practices that meet the criteria for both anticipatory and retrospective efforts in quality assurance. The TapRooT® Corrective Action Helper Guide will lead the team to proven best practices once root causes are identified and ensures the actions are effective. TapRooT®  will also help teams measure and compare current performance against performance standards and goals.

CMS defines PI as the continuous study and improvement of processes with the intent to better services or outcomes, and prevent or decrease the likelihood of problems or barriers to improvement.  TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis for Audits and Proactive Performance Improvement training, tools and software will lead QAPI teams through implementation of a continuous improvement program.  There are countless good QAPI teams out there that are great at identifying problems but struggle with prescribing, implementing and measuring the effectiveness of corrective actions.  They typically prescribe the weakest of corrective actions which generally include the “re” actions:

  • Re-train
  • Re-write the procedure or process
  • Re-mind
  • Re-emphasize
  • Re-evaluate
  • Re-view
  • Re-peat warnings, discipline training, etc.

The strongest corrective actions include putting new or additional safeguards in place, or even better, removing the risk or removing the patient from harms way.

Using TapRooT® to identify the real root causes of quality and performance issues through strong audit and investigation techniques and implementing effective corrective actions that lead to continuous improvement will help the QAPI team achieve Operational Excellence.  The big winners are our loved ones who took care of us and now need our commitment to providing them the quality care they deserve.

Want to learn more? You can contact us through the website Taproot.com, call into our office at 865.539.2139 or attend one of our public TapRooT® Courses or contact us to schedule an onsite course.

 

 

Who Invented Operational Excellence?

March 28th, 2018 by

Who Invented Operational Excellence?

Admiral Hyman G. Rickover

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As a Navy Nuclear Power trained officer, I experienced the rigors of achieving operational excellence first hand.

Rickover explained that there were a series of principles that helped the Nuclear Navy achieve excellence but the top three were:

  1. Total Responsibility
  2. Technical Competence
  3. Facing the Facts

Read about these three principles in a series of articles that I wrote:

http://www.taproot.com/archives/54027

 Rickover lived out this quote:

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He fought against the lax standards that the Navy practiced and implemented a system of excellence to run the Navy’s nuclear reactors.

You might think that he would be praised and lauded by the Navy for his success. Instead, he had to fight every inch of the way to steer a course true to his principles. And the oldest Admiral ever was fired by the youngest Secretary of the Navy ever. Sometimes that’s how Washington politics works.

Want to read more about Rickover’s life and how he developed his concepts of operational/process excellence? Read his semi-official biography (written by the official Nuclear Navy historian Francis Duncan) Rickover – The Struggle for Excellence. (Picture of the book at the top of the page.)

Root Cause Tip: Luck Versus Being Consistent, Success and Failure Can Come From Both

March 14th, 2018 by

Every best practice can be a strength or a weakness. Even one phrase like “I will ____” can be self-defeating or uplifting. “I will succeed” versus “I will fail.” Both phrases set your compass for success or failure. Okay, so what does philosophy have to do with root cause analysis? Simple….

Practice safe behaviors, build and sustain safe and sustainable processes with good best practices, and success is measured by less injuries, less near-misses, and more efficient processes.

Practice unsafe behaviors, build unsafe but sustainable processes with poor best practices, and success is measured by more injuries, more near-misses, and wasteful business processes. Safety only happens by luck!

Guess what? In many cases, you can still be in compliance during audits but still meet the criteria of “unsafe but sustainable processes with poor best practices . . . measured by more injuries, more near-misses, and wasteful business processes.”

This is why Question Number 14 on the TapRooT® Root Cause Tree® is so important.

Not every Causal Factor/Significant Issue that occurred during an incident or was found during an audit is due to a person just breaking a rule or taking shortcuts. In many cases, the employee was following the rules to the “T” when the action that the employee performed, got him/her hurt or got someone else hurt.

Take time to use the TapRooT® Root Cause Tree®, Root Cause Tree® Dictionary, and Corrective Action Helper® as designed to perform consistently with a successful purpose.

Want to learn more? Attend one of our public TapRooT® Courses or contact us to schedule an onsite course.

Join Us for the Quality Track for the 2018 Summit

January 25th, 2018 by

Chris Vallee put an awesome track together for professionals who are involved in quality processes. If that’s you, you don’t want to miss this informative video!

REGISTER NOW or

Learn more!

Sign up now for the February 2018 Global TapRooT® Summit Quality Track

December 19th, 2017 by

 

Need a jumpstart on your Quality Management System’s improvements to better utilize your company’s product realization? Sign up for the Quality Track during the Global TapRooT® Summit, Knoxville, Tennessee, February 26 – March 2, 2018

Improve Your Resource Usage Management by attending:

Mark Paradies (the creator of TapRooT®)

How to Replace 5 Whys with TapRooT® for Better Results

People argue that 5-Whys is a “good enough” root cause analysis tool. They say it’s simple to ask “why” five times and that people in the field can “understand it.” Well, the time has come to put that argument to bed… 5-Whys is inadequate. It has fundamental flaws that make it inadequate. This session will demonstrate how replacing 5-Whys with TapRooT® provides better results.

 

Kevin McManus– Great Systems!

Stop Daily Goofs for Good

This session has a proactive, process-based focus, and promotes the use of systematic improvements to prevent human error and improve cognitive ergonomics on the job.

Using Wearables to Minimize Daily Human Errors

Look at how wearables are being used both now and in the future to help prevent errors and identify problems more effectively.

 

Barb Carr – System Improvements, Inc.

Top 7 Secrets of a Great Investigation Interview

Take your interviewing skills to the next level and collect better quality and quantity of information from your investigative interviews by harnessing the power of the seven secrets.

 

Improve Your Management Responsibility by attending:

 John Boyle

Making Audits an Integral Part of a Proactive Improvement Program –

This session has a proactive, process-based focus, and promotes the use of systematic improvements to prevent human error and improve cognitive ergonomics on the job. Kevin McManus

 Jonathan Kennedy

Influencing Change

Nothing happens without change. Nothing happens without support of change. Learn techniques to increase the ability to change with full management support.

 

Improve Your Analysis and Improvements by attending:

Christopher Vallee – System Improvements, Inc.

What is a Trend and How Can You Find Trends in the TapRooT® Data?

You have invested in TapRooT® and have root cause data, but do you know what the data tells you? Do you know if what you are measuring has changed for the good or the bad? Do you know how to access your trend-able data in your VI Software? Learn what to look for, what needs to be acted on and how to access the data on VI Software.

Performance Improvement Gap Analysis

Put together everything that you learned this week in your Summit Tracks and from your peers, then develop your action plan to hit the ground running.

REGISTER NOW or

Learn more!

My 20+ Year Relationship with 5-Why’s

December 11th, 2017 by

I first heard of 5-Why’s over 20 years ago when I got my first job in Quality. I had no experience of any kind, I got the job because I worked with the Quality Manager’s wife in another department and she told him I was a good guy. True story…but that’s how things worked back then!

When I was first exposed to the 5-Why concept, it did not really make any sense to me; I could not understand how it actually could work, as it seemed like the only thing it revealed was the obvious. So, if it is obvious, why do I need it? That is a pretty good question from someone who did not know much at the time.

I dived into Quality and got all the certifications, went to all the classes and conferences, and helped my company build an industry leading program from the ground up. A recurring concept in the study and materials I was exposed to was 5-Why. I learned the “correct” way to do it. Now I understood it, but I still never thought it was a good way to find root causes.

I transferred to another division of the company to run their safety program. I did not know how to run a safety program – I did know all the rules, as I had been auditing them for years, but I really did not know how to run the program. But I did know quality, and those concepts helped me instill an improvement mindset in the leaders which we successfully applied to safety.

The first thing I did when I took the job was to look at the safety policies and procedures, and there it was; when you have an incident, “ask Why 5 times” to get your root cause! That was the extent of the guidance. So whatever random thought was your fifth Why would be the root cause on the report! The people using it had absolutely no idea how the concept worked or how to do it. And my review of old reports validated this. Since then I have realized this is a common theme with 5-Why’s; there is a very wide variation in the way it is used. I don’t believe it works particularly well even when used correctly, but it usually isn’t in my experience.

Since retiring from my career and coming to work with TapRooT®, I’ve had literally hundreds of conversations with colleagues, clients, and potential clients about 5-Why’s. I used to be somewhat soft when criticizing 5-Why’s and just try to help people understand why TapRooT® gets better results. Recently, I’ve started to take a more militant approach. Why? Because most of the people I talk to already know that 5-Why’s does not work well, but they still use it anyway (easier/cheaper/quicker)!

So it is time to take the gloves off; let’s not dance around this any longer. To quote Mark Paradies:
“5-Why’s is Root Cause Malpractice!”

To those that are still dug in and take offense, I do apologize! I can only share my experience.

For more information, here are some previous blog articles:

What’s Wrong With Cause-and-Effect, 5-Why’s, & Fault Trees

Comparing TapRooT® to Other Root Cause Tools

What’s Fundamentally Wrong with 5-Whys?

Five Trends that Will Impact Companies in Environment, Health and Safety in 2018

November 17th, 2017 by

As we approach 2018, now is a good time to look at some external trends to gauge what is coming down the pike. At System Improvements we recently fired up the crystal balls, and spotted five trends that will impact companies:

  • Proactive Safety Culture,
  • Reporting Capability
  • Focus on Prevention
  • Work force changes
  • Increased Drug Use

Let’s look at each of these.

Proactive Safety Culture: Executives continue to get more involved, safety is seen as an improvement opportunity and something to be managed, rather than a liability driven by chance or “workers unsafe actions”. Preventive methods will be used more, like work site evaluations, audits, functional job analysis, and ergonomics training. Instead of having impossible goals like “Zero Harm”, companies will set improvement KPIs, then investigate, track and trend incidents and near misses and put corrective actions in place

Reporting Capability: User- friendly software like TapRooT® and Enablon is available for capturing data and carrying out analysis. Mobile apps and devices like wearable technology enables rapid collection and dissemination of findings. Training is readily available to make sense of the data collected and empower the front line

Focus on Prevention: Companies take active steps to prevent injuries and promote health and safety. We will see more fitness and wellness initiatives but also focus on “intangible” issues like stress, fatigue and mental health. Companies out of line will face ever- increasing Workers Comp costs

Work Force Changes: The age distribution and values of workers are changing, with millennials entering the workforce. The shortage of skilled workers will get worse, and there will be more contract and temp workers. It will be important to involve all these groups in the EHSQ efforts. There will also be more lone and unsupervised workers, which makes behavior- based safety much more difficult to implement

Increased Use of Illegal and Legalized Drugs:  Serious safety, quality and environmental risk. Executives will have to find ways to manage the opioids cycle where injuries drive prescriptions and workers under the influence of opioids get injured again… In some jurisdictions legalization of marijuana is disqualifying a large share of the worker pool from safely operating vehicles, machinery and equipment. In the Hotels & restaurant industry, research found up to 19% of workers using drugs on a regular basis, a clear risk in e.g. kitchen areas. Alcohol will continue to be an issue, not least in Mining and Construction where up to a fifth of workers are estimated to be affected.

A good way to prepare for these trends is to do effective Root Cause Analysis. The TapRooT® methodology helps companies identify root causes of incidents, and put effective corrective actions in place. The process is also used for proactive audits, where issues can be nipped in the bud. Click here for more information: 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Training.

KISS and Root Cause Analysis

November 1st, 2017 by

I’ve heard many “experts” claim that you need to apply the KISS principle when it comes to root cause analysis. You may hear this too and I want you to understand where these experts lead many people astray.

First, what is KISS? Keep It Simple Stupid! The acronym implies that simple solutions are better solutions. And when simple solution work (are effective) KISS is a dream come true. But remember Einstein’s quote:

Make things as simple as possible, but not simpler.

So let’s start with some of the reasons that these experts say you need to use simple techniques and debunk or demystify each one. Here’s a list of common expert advice.

  1. It’s a waste of time to use full root cause analysis on every problem.
  2. People can’t understand complex root cause analysis techniques.
  3. Learning simple techniques will get people to start thinking deeper about problems.
  4. Simple is just about as good as those fancy techniques.
  5. Managers don’t have time to do fancy root cause analysis and they already know what is wrong.
  6. You can apply those complicated techniques to just the most serious accidents.
  7. The data from the simple investigations will help you identify the more complex issues you need to solve.

I see these arguments all the time. They make me want to scream! Let me debunk each one and then you too can dismiss these “experts” the next time they try one or more of these arguments on your management team.

1. It’s a waste of time to use full root cause analysis on every problem.

I actually sort of agree with this statement. What I don’t agree with is the answer they arrive at. Their answer is that you should apply some “simple” root cause analysis technique (let’s just say 5-Whys as an example) to “solve” these problems that don’t deserve a well thought out answer.

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First, what do I have against their ideas of simple root cause analysis? If you’ve been reading this blog for a while you know what I’m going the explain, so just skip ahead. For those who don’t know what’s wrong with most “simple” root cause analysis techniques, I would suggest start reading from the top of the links below until you are convinced that most expert advice about “simple” root cause analysis is root cause analysis malpractice. If you haven’t been convinced by the end of the links … perhaps you are one of the experts I’m talking about. Here’s the list of links:

What happens when root cause analysis becomes too simple? Six problems I’ve observed. 

An Example of 5 Whys – Is this Root Cause Analysis? Let Me Know Your Thoughts…

What’s Wrong with 5-Whys??? – Complete Article 

What’s Fundamentally Wrong with 5-Whys?

Teruyuki Minoura (Toyota Exec) Talks About Problems with 5-Whys

I believe that one of the biggest root cause analysis problems that companies face is that they are performing “root cause analysis” on problems that don’t need to be analyzed.  YES – I said it. Not every problem deserves a root cause analysis.

What problems don’t need to be analyzed? Problems that aren’t going to teach you anything significant. I call these “paper cut problems.” You don’t need to investigate paper cuts.

But some people would say that you do need to investigate every loss time injury and medical treatment case. Maybe … maybe not.

You do need to investigate an incident if it could have caused an outcome that you are trying to prevent and there are worthy lessons learned. Some medical treatment cases fall into this category. They got a cut finger but they could have lost their whole arm.

Two similar examples are provided in the book: Using the Essential TapRooT® Techniques to Investigate Low-to-Medium Risk Incidents. One is a sprained ankle and one is a sprained wrist. Both came from falling down. One was judged worthy of a full but simple root cause analysis using the essential features of the TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis System. One was judged not worthy of a full investigation after a simple SnapCharT® was developed. Interested in how this works? Read the book. It’s only 100 pages long and seeing how to judge if a root cause analysis is worthwhile is worth it. (And you will learn how to apply TapRooT® simply to low-to-medium risk incidents.)

Once you know how to do a real “simple” investigation with an effective technique, you won’t need to do bad root cause analysis with an ineffective technique.

2. People can’t understand complex root cause analysis techniques.

I don’t know every “complex” root cause analysis technique but I do know that this statement does NOT apply to TapRooT®. Why? Because we’ve tested it.

One “test” was at a refinery. The Operation Manager (a good guy) thought that TapRooT® was a good system but wasn’t sure that his operators would understand it. We decided to run a test. We decided to teach a basic class to all his union stewards. Then refinery management did a focus group with the shop stewards.

I was one of the instructors and from the course examples that they analyzed, I knew that they were really enjoying finding real root causes rather than placing blame.

They did the focus group (with us in another room). I could hear what was going on. The first question the facilitator asked was: “Did you understand the TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis Technique?” One of the shop stewards said …

“If I can run a Cat Cracker I can certainly understand this! After all, it’s not rocket science!”

And that’s one of the great parts about TapRooT®. We’ve added expert systems for analysis of equipment and human performance problems, but we’ve kept the system understandable and made it easy to use. Making it seem like it isn’t rocket science (even though there is a whole bunch of science embedded in it) is the secret sauce of TapRooT®.

3. Learning simple techniques will get people to start thinking deeper about problems.

Learning to count is required before you learn calculus BUT counting over and over again does not teach you calculus.

If you don’t understand the causes of human performance problems, you won’t find the causes of the problems by asking why. And I don’t care how many times you ask why … it still won’t work.

For years we did a basic poll at the start of our 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Courses. We asked:

“How many of you have had any formal training in human factors or the causes of human error?”

Only about 2% of the attendees had ANY training on the causes of human error. But almost everybody that attended our training said that they had previously been assigned to find the causes of human errors. I wonder how well that went? (I can tell you from the student feedback, they said that they really DID NOT address the real root causes in their previous investigations.)

So, NO. Learning simple techniques DOES NOT get people to “think deeper” about problems.

4. Simple is just about as good as those fancy techniques.

NO WAY.

First, I’ve never seen a good example of 5-Whys. I’ve seen hundreds of bad examples that 5-Why experts thought were good examples. One “good example” that I remember was published in Quality Progress, the magazine from the American Society for Quality (ASQ). I couldn’t stand it. I had to write a reply. When I sent the letter to the editor, they asked me to write a whole article … so I did. To see the example and my article that was published in Quality Progress, see page 32 of the link below:

Under Scrutiny: A Critical Look at Root Cause Analysis.

Simple is not “almost as good” as real root cause analysis (TapRooT®). If you would like another example, see Chapter 3: Comparing the Results of a 5-Why Investigation to a Basic TapRooT® Investigation in the book, Using the Essential TapRooT® Techniques to Investigate Low-to-Medium Risk Incidents.

That’s it – Case Closed. Those “simple” techniques are NOT just about as good as TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis.

5. Managers don’t have time to do fancy root cause analysis and they already know what is wrong.

Once again, I’m reminding of a saying:

Why is there never enough time to do it right,
but there is always enough time to do it over? 

How many times have I seen managers misdiagnose problems because they didn’t find the root causes and then have bigger accidents because they didn’t fix the near-misses and small accidents?

The percentage of managers trained in the causes of human error is very similar to the statistics I previously provided (2%). This means that managers need an effective root cause analysis technique … just like investigators need an effective technique. That’s why the standard corrective actions they use don’t solve the problems and we have accidents that happen over and over again.

So if you don’t have time, don’t worry. You will make time to do it over and over again.

That reminds me of a quote from a plant manager I knew…

“If we investigated every incident, we’d do nothing but investigate incidents!”

6. You can apply those complicated techniques to just the most serious accidents.

I’ve seen companies saving their “best” root cause analysis for their big accidents. Here are the two problems I see with that.

FIRST, they have the big accidents BECAUSE they didn’t solve the precursor incidents. Why? because they didn’t do good root cause analysis on the precursor incidents. Thus, applying poor root cause analysis to the lessor incidents CAUSES the big accidents.

SECOND, their investigators don’t get practice using their “best” root cause analysis techniques because the “most serious” incidents are infrequent. Therefore, their investigators get rusty or they never really develop the skills they need by using the techniques on smaller incidents that could give them practice.

The key here is to learn to use TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis to investigate smaller problems. And that’s why we wrote a book about using TapRooT® for simple incidents: Using the Essential TapRooT® Techniques to Investigate Low-to-Medium Risk Incidents.

Don’t wait for big accidents to find and fix the causes of your biggest risks. Find and fix them when they give you warnings (the precursor incidents).

7. The data from the simple investigations will help you identify the more complex issues you need to solve.

Why do people think that analyzing lots of bad data will yield good results? I think it is the misconception about mathematics. A good formula doesn’t provide knowledge from bad data.

If you don’t really know how to analyze data, you should attend our pre-Summit course:

Advanced Trending Techniques

As W. Edwards Deming said:

“Without data, you’re just another person with an opinion.”

And if you know much about Deming, you know that he was very interested in the accuracy of the data.

If you aren’t finding the real root causes, data about your BAD ANALYSIS only tells you what you were doing wrong. You now have data about what was NOT the causes of your problems. Go analyze that!

So data from BAD simple investigations DOES NOT help you solve your more complex issues. All it does is mislead your management.

THAT’S IT. All the bad advice debunked. Now, what do you need to do?

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1. Read the book:

TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis Leadership Lessons

You will learn the theory behind performance improvement and you will be well on your way to understanding what management needs to do to really improve safety, quality, equipment reliability, and operational/financial performance.

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2. Read the book:

TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis Implementation

You will know how to implement a real, effective root cause analysis system for low-to-medium risk incidents as well as major accidents.

3. If you haven’t done it already, attend one of our 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Courses. See the list of our upcoming public 5-Day TapRooT® Courses held around the world at this link:

http://www.taproot.com/store/5-Day-Courses/

And don’t take any more bad advice from experts who don’t know what they are talking about!

PS: If you have questions or want to discuss what you read in the books, contact me (Mark Paradies) at 865-539-2139 or by e-mail by clicking HERE.

Root Cause Analysis for the FDA

September 13th, 2017 by

RootCauseAnalysis

What does the FDA want when you perform a root cause analysis?

The answer is quite simple. They want you to find the real, fixable root causes of the problem and then fix them so they don’t happen again.

Even better, they would like you to audit/access your own processes and find and fix problems before they cause incidents.

And even better yet, they would like to arrive to perform a FDA 483 inspection and find no issues. Nothing. You have found and fixed any problems before they arrive because that’s the way you run your facility.

How can you be that good? You apply root cause analysis PROACTIVELY.

You don’t want to have to explain and fix problems found in a FDA 483 inspection or, worse yet, get a warning letter. You want to have manufacturing excellence.

TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis can help you reactively find and fix the real root causes of problems or proactively improve performance to avoid having quality issues. Want to find out how? Attend one of our guaranteed root cause analysis courses. See:

http://www.taproot.com/courses

I’d suggest one of our public 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Courses to get started. Then have a course at your site to get everyone involved in improving performance.

Want more information before you sign up for a course? Contact us by CLICKING HERE.

German Regulators Pull Pharmaceutical Manufacturing License for Bad Root Cause Analysis

August 16th, 2017 by

How can bad root cause analysis get a pharmaceutical manufacturer in trouble? Read this article:

http://www.fiercepharma.com/manufacturing/german-regulators-yank-manufacturing-certificate-from-dr-reddy-s-india-plant

See the regulator’s report here:

http://eudragmdp.ema.europa.eu/inspections/gmpc/searchGMPNonCompliance.do;jsessionid=Nfjr4BxTjUIchrw5Cz8sxg2ks-g1ohm3P0FCWfkI-pRSLAnTUiyt!385493004?ctrl=searchGMPNCResultControlList&action=Drilldown&param=43089

The first step to using advanced root cause analysis is to get your people trained. But AFTER the training, management must ensure that the system is being used, the results are being documented, and the corrective actions are getting implemented.

What does management need to know about root cause analysis? They should know at least as much as the investigators and they need to know what their role is in the root cause analysis process. That’s why we wrote the new book:

Root Cause Analysis Leadership Book

TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis Leadership Lessons

Get your copy now and make sure that you are managing your high performance systems.

Where did you eat last weekend? (or, why do companies continue to not learn from their mistakes?)

July 24th, 2017 by

Happy Monday. I hope everyone had a good weekend and got recharged for the week ahead.

Every few weeks, I get a craving for Mexican food. Maybe a sit-down meal with a combo plate and a Margarita, maybe Tex-Mex or maybe traditional. It’s all good.

Sometimes, though, a simple California Style Burrito does the trick. This weekend was one of those weekends. Let’s see, what are my choices…? Moe’s, Willy’s, Qdoba, Chipotle?

Chipotle? What??!!!

Unfortunately, Chipotle is back in the news. More sick people. Rats falling from the ceiling. Not good.

It seems like we have been here before. I must admit I did not think they would survive last time, but they did. What about this time? In the current world of social media we shall see.

For those of us in safety or quality, the story is all too familiar. The same problem keeps happening. Over and Over…and Over

So why do companies continue to not learn from mistakes? A few possible reasons:

**They don’t care
**They are incompetent
**They don’t get to true root causes when investigating problems
**They write poor corrective actions
**They don’t have the systems in place for good performance or performance improvement

TapRooT® can help with the last three. Please join us at a future course; you can see the schedule and enroll HERE

So, what do you think? Why do companies not learn from their mistakes? Leave comments below.

By the way, my Burrito from Moe’s was great!

Six Sigma: Better Root Cause Analysis and Corrective Actions

June 22nd, 2017 by

I remember first learning about root cause analysis during Six Sigma training. The main methods we used were 5 Whys and Fishbone diagrams, but somehow we had a hard time arriving at good corrective actions. It took time and testing to get there, and still the fixes were not always robust.

Since then, I have learned a lot more about RCA. Unguided deductive reasoning tools like 5 Whys or Fishbones rely heavily on the knowledge and experience of the investigator. Since nobody can be an expert in every contributing field, this leads to investigator bias. Or, as the old adage goes: “If a hammer is your only tool, all your problems will start looking like nails”.

Other issues with deductive reasoning are investigations identifying only single causes (when in reality there are several), or ignorance of generic root causes that have broader quality impacts. Results will also be inconsistent; if several teams analyze the same issue, results can be wildly divergent. Which one is correct? All of them? None?

This is where the TapRooT® methodology has benefits over other tools. It is an expert system that guides investigators to look at a range of potential causal factors, like human engineering, management systems and procedures. There are no iterations of hypotheses to prove or disprove so investigator bias is not a problem.

The process is repeatable, identifies all specific and generic causes and guides the formulation of strong corrective actions. It is centered on humans, systems and processes, and the decisions they make every day.

The supporting TapRooT® Software is designed to enable investigators to keep efforts focused and organized:

  1. define the problem in a SnapCharT®
  2. identify Causal Factors and Root Causes with the Root Cause Tree®, and
  3. formulate sustainable corrective actions using the Corrective Action Helper® module

The TapRooT® process avoids blame, is easy to learn and quickly improves root cause analysis outcomes.

In Six Sigma parlance, the SnapCharT® is used for problem definition (Define), the Root Cause Tree® and trending for root cause identification (Measure and Analyze), and the corrective action process to define effective fixes (Improve).

#TapRooT_RCA

To Hypothesize or NOT to Hypothesize … that is the Question!

May 16th, 2017 by

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Yet again, another article in Quality Progress magazine (May 2017 – Solid Footings) suggests that the basis for a root cause analysis is a hypothesis.

We have discussed the problems of starting a root cause analysis with a hypothesis before but it is probably worth discussing it one more time…

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Don’t start with the answer.

Starting with the answer (a hypothesis) is a bad practice. Why? Because of a human tendency called “confirmation bias.” You can read about confirmation bias in the scientific literature (do a Google search) but the simple answer is that people focus on evidence that proves their hypothesis and disregard evidence that conflicts with their hypothesis. This is a natural human tendency that is difficult to avoid if you start with a hypothesis.

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I’ve seen many root cause experts pontificate about investigators “keeping an open mind” and disprove their own hypothesis. That’s great. That’s like saying, “Don’t breath.” Once you propose an answer … you start to believe it and PROVE it.

What should you do?

Use a system that doesn’t start with a hypothesis.Try TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis.

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You will learn to use a SnapCharT® to collect information about what happened without jumping to conclusions.

Once you understand what happened and identify the Causal Factors, you will then be ready to analyze why the Safeguards failed (find the root causes) without jumping to conclusions by using advanced tools: the Root Cause Tree® Diagram and the Root Cause Tree® Dictionary.

This system gets you to think beyond your current knowledge!

The system has been proven to work at major companies and different industries around the world.

Want to learn more to improve quality and safety at your company? Attend one of our public root cause analysis courses. See the list of upcoming courses at:

http://www.taproot.com/store/Courses/

Healthcare Professionals! Please come visit the TapRooT® Booth at the NPSF Conference

May 10th, 2017 by

If you are coming to the conference (May 17 – 19), please stop by and see us at Booth 300; Per Ohstrom and I will both be there.

Of course TapRooT® can help you with patient safety and reducing Sentinal Events. But there are many more ways to use TapRoot® in your hospital:

Improve Employee Safety and reduce injuries

Improve Quality, reduce human error, and make your processes more efficient

We hope to see you there. We have a free gift for the first 500 people, so don’t miss out!

Are you attending the ASQ World Conference on Quality in Charlotte?

April 19th, 2017 by

If you are attending the conference, please stop by the TapRooT® Booth (#213) and say hello. Chris Vallee, Per Ohstrom, and I will be there.

The first 500 visitors will receive a special gift, the world’s fastest root cause analysis tool!

Bring a business card and enter the drawing for cool TapRooT® stuff during the Tuesday exhibit hall extravaganza.

Want to see the new TapRooT® VI 6.2.0 software? Come by on Tuesday from 09:00-1:30 and we’ll be happy to walk through a quality example for you.

See you then!

Why do Audits fail and why do I have so many repeat findings? Take a detour!!!

March 27th, 2017 by

Have you ever performed an audit and got frustrated when you found the same issues as the last audit? I feel your pain….we all have. Why does this happen so much? Because most companies audit programs look a little like this:

Screen Shot 2017-03-27 at 4.00.54 PM

Q: What is missing from this picture?

A: Root Cause Analysis, of course!!

Many companies actually have good programs for FINDING problems without having a good program for FIXING problems. If you want problems fixed, root cause analysis has to be part of it. So on the road to improvement, take a DETOUR to Root Cause Land!

Screen Shot 2017-03-27 at 4.13.20 PM

For your program to be effective, it should look more like this:

Screen Shot 2017-03-27 at 4.04.23 PM

The best way to do root cause analysis on audits? TapRooT®.

We have a new course, TapRooT® for Audits, that we will be holding in Charlotte, NC on May 4-5. Why not join us? For more information and to register, click HERE

What’s Wrong with this Data?

March 20th, 2017 by

Below are sentinel event types from 2014 – 2016 as reported to the Joint Commission (taken from the 1/13/2017 report at https://www.jointcommission.org/assets/1/18/Summary_4Q_2016.pdf):

Summary Event Data

Reviewing this data, one might ask …

What can we learn?

I’m not trying to be critical of the Joint Commissions efforts to collect and report sentinel event data. In fact, it is refreshing to see that some hospitals are willing to admit that there is room for improvement. Plus, the Joint Commission is pushing for greater reporting and improved root cause analysis. But, here are some questions to consider…

  • Does a tic up or down in a particular category mean something?
  • Why are suicides so high and infections so low?
  • Why is there no category for misdiagnosis while being treated?

Perhaps the biggest question one might ask is why are there only 824 sentinel events in the database when estimates put the number of sentinel events in the USA at over 100,000 per year.

Of course, not all hospitals are part of the Joint Commission review process but a large fraction are.

If we are conservative and estimate that there should be 50,000 sentinel events reported to the Joint Commission each year, we can conclude that only 1.6% of the sentinel events are being reported.

That makes me ask some serious questions.

1. Are the other events being hidden? Ignored? Or investigated and not reported?

Perhaps one of the reasons that the healthcare industry is not improving performance at a faster rate is that they are only learning from a tiny fraction of their operating experience. After all, if you only learned from 1.6% of your experience, how long would it take to improve your performance?

2. If a category like “Unitended Retention of a Foreign Body” stays at over 100 incidents per year, why aren’t we learning to prevent these events? Are the root cause analyses inadequate? Are the corrective actions inadequate or not being implemented? Or is there a failure to share best practices to prevent these incidents across the healthcare industry (each facility must learn by one or more of their own errors). If we don’t have 98% of the data, how can we measure if we are getting better or worse? Since our 50,000 number is a gross approximation, is it possible to learn anything at all from this data?

To me, it seems like the FIRST challenge when improving performance is to develop a good measurement system. Each hospital should have HUNDREDS or at least DOZENS of sentinel events to learn from each year. Thus, the Joint Commission should have TENS or HUNDREDS of THOUSANDS of sentinel events in their database.

If the investigation, root cause analysis, and corrective actions were effective and being shared, there should be great progress in eliminating whole classes of sentinel events and this should be apparent in the Joint Commission data.

This improved performance would be extremely important to the patients that avoided harm and we should see an overall decrease in the cost of medical care as mistakes are reduced.

This isn’t happening.

What can you do to get things started?

1. Push for full reporting of sentinel events AND near-misses at your hospital.

2. Implement advanced root cause analysis to find the real root causes of sentinel events and to develop effective fixes that STOP repeat incidents.

3. Share what your hospital learns about preventing sentinel events across the industry so that others will have the opportunity to improve.

That’s a start. After twelve years of reporting, shouldn’t every hospital get started?

If you are at a healthcare facility that is

  • reporting ALL sentinel events,
  • investigating most of your near-misses,
  • doing good root cause analysis,
  • implementing effective corrective actions that
  • stop repeat sentinel events,

I’d like to hear from you. We are holding a Summit in 2018 and I would like to document your success story.

If you would like to be at a hospital with a success story, but you need to improve your reporting, root cause analysis and corrective actions, contact us for assistance. We would be glad to help.

Top 3 Reasons for Bad Root Cause Analysis and How You Can Overcome Them…

February 7th, 2017 by

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I’ve heard many high level managers complain that they see the same problems happen over and over again. They just can’t get people to find and fix the problems’ root causes. Why does this happen and what can management do to overcome these issues? Read on to find out.

 

1. BLAME

Blame is the number one reason for bad root cause analysis.

Why?

Because people who are worried about blame don’t fully cooperate with an investigation. They don’t admit their involvement. They hold back critical information. Often this leads to mystery accidents. No one knows who was involved, what happened, or why it happened.

As Bart Simpson says:

“I didn’t do it.”
“Nobody saw me do it.”
“You can’t prove anything.”

Blame is so common that people take it for granted.

Somebody makes a mistake and what do we do? Discipline them.

If they are a contractor, we fire them. No questions asked.

And if the mistake was made by senior management? Sorry … that’s not how blame works. Blame always flows downhill. At a certain senior level management becomes blessed. Only truly horrific accidents like the Deepwater Horizon or Bhopal get senior managers fired or jailed. Then again, maybe those accidents aren’t bad enough for discipline for senior management.

Think about the biggest economic collapse in recent history – the housing collapse of 2008. What senior banker went to jail?

But be an operator and make a simple mistake like pushing the wrong button or a mechanic who doesn’t lock out a breaker while working on equipment? You may be fired or have the feds come after you to put you in jail.

Talk to Kurt Mix. He was a BP engineer who deleted a few text messages from his personal cell phone AFTER he had turned it over to the feds. He was the only person off the Deepwater Horizon who faced criminal charges. Or ask the two BP company men who represented BP on the Deepwater Horizon and faced years of criminal prosecution. 

How do you stop blame and get people to cooperate with investigations? Here are two best practices.

A. Start Small …

If you are investigating near-misses that could have become major accidents and you don’t discipline people who spill the beans, people will learn to cooperate. This is especially true if you reward people for participating and develop effective fixes that make the work easier and their jobs less hazardous. 

Small accidents just don’t have the same cloud of blame hanging over them so if you start small, you have a better chance of getting people to cooperate even if a blame culture has already been established.

B. Use a SnapCharT® to facilitate your investigation and report to management.

We’ve learned that using a SnapCharT® to facilitate an investigation and to show the results to management reduces the tendency to look for blame. The SnapCharT® focuses on what happened and “who did it” becomes less important.

Often, the SnapCharT® shows that there were several things that could have prevented the accident and that no one person was strictly to blame. 

What is a SnapCharT®? Attend any TapRooT® Training and you will learn how to use them. See:

TapRooT® Training

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2. FIRST ASK WHAT NOT WHY

Ever see someone use 5-Whys to find root causes? They start with what they think is the problem and then ask “Why?” five times. Unfortunately this easy methods often leads investigators astray.

Why?

Because they should have started by asking what before they asked why.

Many investigators start asking why before they understand what happened. This causes them to jump to conclusions. They don’t gather critical evidence that may lead them to the real root causes of the problem. And they tend to focus on a single Causal Factor and miss several others that also contributed to the problem. 

How do you get people to ask what instead of why?

Once again, the SnapCharT® is the best tool to get investigators focused on what happened, find the incidents details, identify all the Causal Factors and the information about each Causal Factor that the investigator needs to identify each problem’s root causes.

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3. YOU MUST GO BEYOND YOUR CURRENT KNOWLEDGE

Many investigators start their investigation with a pretty good idea of the root causes they are looking for. They already know the answers. All they have to do is find the evidence that supports their hypothesis.

What happens when an investigator starts an investigation by jumping to conclusions?

They ignore evidence that is counter to their hypothesis. This problem is called a:

Confirmation Bias

It has been proven in many scientific studies.

But there is an even bigger problem for investigators who think they know the answer. They often don’t have the training in human factors and equipment reliability to recognize the real root causes of each of the Causal Factors. Therefore, they only look for the root causes they know about and don’t get beyond their current knowledge.

What can you do to help investigators look beyond their current knowledge and avoid confirmation bias?

Have them use the SnapCharT® and the TapRooT® Root Cause Tree® Diagram when finding root causes. You will be amazed at the root causes your investigators discover that they previously would have overlooked.

How can your investigators learn to use the Root Cause Tree® Diagram? Once again, send them to TapRooT® Training.

THAT’S IT…

The TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis System can help your investigators overcome the top 3 reasons for bad root cause analysis. And that’s not all. There are many other advantages for management and investigators (and employees) when people use TapRooT® to solve problems.

If you haven’t tried TapRooT® to solve problems, you don’t know what you are missing.

If your organization faces:

  • Quality Issues
  • Safety Incidents
  • Repeat Equipment Failures
  • Sentinel Events
  • Environmental Incidents
  • Cost Overruns
  • Missed Schedules
  • Plant Downtime

You need to be apply the best root cause analysis system: TapRooT®.

Learn more at: 

http://www.taproot.com/products-services/about-taproot

And find the dates and locations for our public TapRooT® Training at:

 http://www.taproot.com/store/Courses/

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How can TapRooT® help with your ISO programs (or other management system issues)?

January 25th, 2017 by

Happy Wednesday and welcome to this week’s root cause analysis tips.

Many companies are ISO certified and some of those that are not have some type of management system. There are too many different systems and standards out there to discuss individually, but one of the common themes is continuous improvement.

Whether you use a commonly known management system or developed your own, one of your goals should be to improve your system/business. When I think of a management system, I think of it as a framework for how you manage your business. Whether required or not, incorporating continuous improvement is a smart thing to do.

While ISO has hundreds of standards, some of the most commonly known are 9000 (Quality) and 14000 (Environmental); coming down the pike soon is 45001 (Safety). There are also numerous industry specific standards. Many of the ISO standards use a common framework that includes the PDCA (plan, do, check, act) cycle. This is where TapRooT® can help.

PDCA is a simple process that has been in use widely since the 1950’s. I do not know many processes that have endured that long. So why? Because it is easy and it works.

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As part of PDCA, you have to determine what to fix, how to fix it, and whether it works. Sounds a little like root cause analysis and corrective action, doesn’t it? So if you were going to use PDCA to help solve your problems, what would you use for root cause analysis? If I were you, I would use TapRooT®. Need help with corrective actions? Use the Corrective Action Helper®, SMARTER Matrix, and Safeguards hierarchy. You can incorporate TapRooT® tools into any improvement framework you use.

Also, don’t forget the importance of auditing. This should be part of your management system as well. We’ve taught auditing with TapRooT® for years, but we recently developed a new course specifically for Auditors, TapRooT® for Audits, and wrote a new book, TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis for Audits and Proactive Performance Improvement. The primary topic of the book is auditing, but we also have a short section on PDCA. We’ll be teaching this course in Charlotte, NC in May if you would like to join us. Or, if you are already TapRooT® trained, you can get the book on our store.

Audits Kit

Thanks for reading the blog, and best of luck with your improvement efforts.

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Stopping Future Accidents by Correcting Problems That Did Not Cause The Accidents Being Investigated Submitted by: James Watson, Regional Specialist, System Safety Branch FAA, Alaska Challenge TapRooT® investigation often identify actions and conditions that didn’t cause the actual accident being evaluated but that could be significant and, if not corrected, could combine with other factors …

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