Category: TapRooT

Technically Speaking – March Customer Satisfaction Survey Winner

April 5th, 2018 by

Here at System Improvements, customer satisfaction is very important to us. We strive to ensure our customers’ questions are treated in a timely and efficient manner. This is so important to us that it’s actually part of our Technical Support Mission Statement:

To provide timely, courteous, and effective technical support to System Improvements staff and all TapRooT® customers, achieving customer satisfaction and process efficiency.

In order to ensure we are providing great service, we have implemented a new customer satisfaction rating system, where our customers can rate their experience with our Support Team. The feedback has been extremely valuable to us.

As a thank you to all our customers who take the time to fill out a Survey, all respondents are entered into a monthly drawing to win a TapRooT® polo shirt.
Everyone, let’s congratulate the user, who prefers to stay anonymous, from National Grid as the winner for the month of March!

Scientific Method and Root Cause Analysis

April 4th, 2018 by

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I had someone tell me that the ONLY way to do root cause analysis was to use the scientific method. After all, this is the way that all real science is performed.

Being an engineer (rather than a scientist), I had a problem with this statement. After all, I had done or reviewed hundreds (maybe thousands?) of root cause analyses and I had never used the scientific method. Was I wrong? Is the scientific method really the only or best answer?

First, to answer this question, you have to define the scientific method. And that’s the first problem. Some say the scientific method was invented in the 17th century and was the reason that we progressed beyond the dark ages. Others claim that the terminology “scientific method” is a 20th-century invention. But, no matter when you think the scientific method was invented, there are a great variety of methods that call themselves “the scientific method.” (Google “scientific method” and see how many different models you can find. The one presented above is an example.)

So let’s just say the scientific method that the person was insisting was the ONLY way to perform a root cause analysis required the investigator to develop a hypothesis and then gather evidence to either prove or disprove the hypothesis. That’s commonly part of most methods that call themselves the scientific method.

What’s the problem with this hypothesis testing model? People don’t do it very well. There’s even a scientific term the problem that people have disproving their hypothesis. It’s called CONFIRMATION BIAS. You can Google the term and read for hours. But the short description of the problem is that when people develop a hypothesis that they believe in, they tend to gather evidence to prove what they believe and disregard evidence that is contrary to their hypothesis. This is a natural human tendency – think of it like breathing. You can tell someone not to breath, but they will breath anyway.

What did my friend say about this problem with the scientific method? That it could be overcome by teaching people that they had to disprove all other theories and also look for evidence to disproves their theory.

The second part of this answer is like telling people not to breath. But what about the first part of the solution? Could people develop competing theories and then disprove them to prove that there was only one way the accident could have occurred? Probably not.

The problem with developing all possible theories is that your knowledge is limited. And, of course, how long would it take if you did have unlimited knowledge to develop all possible theories and prove or disprove them?

The biggest problem that accident investigators face is limited knowledge.

We used to take a poll at the start of each root cause analysis class that we taught. We asked:

“How many of you have had any type of formal training
in human factors or why people make human errors?”

The answer was always less than 5%.

Then we asked:

“How many of you have been asked to investigate
incidents that included human errors?”

The answer was always close to 100%.

So how many of these investigators could hypothesize all the potential causes for a human error and how would they prove or disprove them?

That’s one simple reason why the scientific method is not the only way, or even a good way, to investigate incidents and accidents.

Need more persuading? Read these articles on the problems with the scientific method:

The End of Theory: The Data Deluge Makes The Scientific Method Obsolete

The Scientific Method is a Myth

What Flaws Exist Within the Scientific Method?

Is the Scientific Method Seriously Flawed?

What’s Wrong with the Scientific Method?

Problems with “The Scientific Method”

That’s just a small handful of the articles out there.

Let me assume that you didn’t read any of the articles. Therefore, I will provide one convincing example of what’s wrong with the scientific method.

Isaac Newton, one of the world’s greatest mathematicians, developed the universal law of gravity. Supposedly he did this using the scientific method. And it worked on apples and planets. The problem is, when atomic and subatomic matter was discovered, the “law” of gravity didn’t work. There were other forces that governed subatomic interactions.

Enter Albert Einstein and quantum physics. A whole new set of laws (or maybe you called them “theories”) that ruled the universe. These theories were proven by the scientific method. But what are we discovering now? Those theories aren’t “right” either. There are things in the universe that don’t behave the way that quantum physics would predict. Einstein was wrong!

So, if two of the smartest people around – Newton and Einstein – used the scientific method to develop answers that were wrong but that most everyone believed … what chance do you and I have to develop the right answer during our next incident investigation?

Now for the good news.

Being an engineer, I didn’t start with the scientific method when developing the TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis System. Instead, I took an engineering approach. But you don’t have to be an engineer (or a human factors expert) to use it to understand what caused an accident and what you can do to stop a future similar accident from happening.

Being an engineer, I had my fair share of classes in science. Physics, math, and chemistry are all part of an engineer’s basic training. But engineers learn to go beyond science to solve problems (and design things) using models that have limitations. A useful model can be properly applied by an engineer to design a building, an electrical transmission network, a smartphone, or a 747 without understanding the limitations of quantum mechanics.

Also, being an engineer I found that the best college course I ever had that helped me understand accidents wasn’t an engineering course. It was a course on basic human factors. A course that very few engineers take.

By combining the knowledge of high reliability systems that I gained in the Nuclear Navy with my knowledge of engineering and human factors, I developed a model that could be used by people without engineering and human factors training to understand what happened during an incident, how it happened, why it happened, and how it could be prevented from happening again. We have been refining this model (the TapRooT® System) for about thirty years – making it better and more usable – using the feedback from tens of thousands of users around the world. We have seen it applied in a wide variety of industries to effectively solve equipment and human performance issues to improve safety, quality, production, and equipment reliability. These are real world tests with real world success (see the Success Stories at this link).

So, the next time someone tells you that the ONLY way to investigate an incident is the scientific method, just smile and know that they may have been right in the 17th century, but there is a better way to do it today.

If you don’t know how to use the TapRooT® System to solve problems, perhaps you should attend one of our courses. There is a basic 2-Day Course and an advanced 5-Day Course. See the schedule for public courses HERE. Or CONTACT US about having a course at your site.

Technically Speaking – SnapCharT® Tips

March 29th, 2018 by

Does that picture ever represent you after completing an exhaustive SnapCharT®? If not, we listed a few resources to help you master the SnapCharT® tool in TapRooT® VI.

Tips For Building a SnapCharT®

SnapCharT® Versions

SnapCaps

Technically Speaking is a weekly series that highlights various aspects of the TapRooT® VI software and occasionally includes a little Help Desk humor.

Remember, just because it’s technical, it doesn’t mean it has to be complicated!

Are you a Proficient TapRooT® Investigator?

March 19th, 2018 by

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I teach a lot of TapRooT® courses all over the world, to many different industries and departments.  I often get the same questions from students during these courses.  One of the common questions is, “How do I maintain my proficiency as a TapRooT® investigator?”

This is a terrific question, and one that you should think carefully on.  To get a good answer, let’s look at a different example.:

Let’s say you’ve been tasked with putting together an Excel spreadsheet for your boss.  It doesn’t have to be anything too fancy, but she did ask that you include pivot tables in order to easily sort the data in multiple ways.  You decide to do a quick on-line course on Excel to brush up on the newest techniques, and you put together a great spreadsheet.

Now, if your boss asked you to produce another spreadsheet 8 months from now, what would happen?  You’d probably remember that you can use pivot tables, but you’ve probably forgotten exactly how it works.  You’ll most likely have to relearn the technique again, looking back over your last one, or maybe hitting YouTube as a refresher.  It would have been nice if you had worked on a few spreadsheets in the meantime to maintain the skills you learned from your first Excel course.  And what happens if Microsoft comes out with a new version of Excel?

Performing TapRooT® investigations are very similar.  The techniques are not difficult; they can be used by pretty much anyone, once they’ve been trained.  However, you have to practice these skills to get good at them and maintain your proficiency.  When you leave your TapRooT® course, you are ready to conduct your first investigation, and those techniques are still fresh.  If you wait 8 months before you actually use TapRooT®, you’ll probably need to refresh your skills.

In order to remain proficient, we recommend the following:

  • Obviously, you need to attend an initial TapRooT® training session.  We would not recommend trying to learn a technique by reading a book.  You need practice and guidance to properly use any advanced technique.
  • After your class, we recommend you IMMEDIATELY go perform an investigation, probably within the next 2 weeks or so.  You need to quickly use TapRooT® in your own work environment.  You need to practice it in your own conference room, know where your materials will be kept, know who you’re going to contact, etc.  Get the techniques ingrained into your normal office routine right away.
  • We then recommend that you use TapRooT® at least every month.  That doesn’t necessarily mean that you must perform a full incident investigation monthly, but maybe just use a few of the techniques.  For example, you could perform an audit and run those results though the Root Cause Tree®.  Anything to keep proficient using the techniques.
  • Refresher training is also a wonderful idea.  We would recommend attending a refresher course every 2 years to make sure you are up to speed on the latest software and techniques.  If you’ve attended a 2-Day TapRooT® course, maybe a 5-Day Advanced Team Leader Course would be a good choice.
  • Finally, attending the Annual Global TapRooT® Summit is a great way to keep up to speed on your TapRooT® techniques.  You can attend a specialized Pre-Summit course (Advanced Trending Techniques, or Equifactor® Equipment Troubleshooting, or maybe an Evidence Collection course), and then attend a Summit track of your choosing.

There is no magic here.  The saying, “Use it, or Lose it” definitely applies!

TapRooT® Around the World

March 16th, 2018 by

TapRooT® instructor, Marco Flores-Verdugo, sent us these photos from a course in Monterrey, Mexico that Marco and Jesus Reynoso taught. Looks like a fun group, and they had a good time learning how to use TapRooT®.

Want to attend a TapRooT® training course?

5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Training

2-Day TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis Training

Root Cause Tip: Luck Versus Being Consistent, Success and Failure Can Come From Both

March 14th, 2018 by

Every best practice can be a strength or a weakness. Even one phrase like “I will ____” can be self-defeating or uplifting. “I will succeed” versus “I will fail.” Both phrases set your compass for success or failure. Okay, so what does philosophy have to do with root cause analysis? Simple….

Practice safe behaviors, build and sustain safe and sustainable processes with good best practices, and success is measured by less injuries, less near-misses, and more efficient processes.

Practice unsafe behaviors, build unsafe but sustainable processes with poor best practices, and success is measured by more injuries, more near-misses, and wasteful business processes. Safety only happens by luck!

Guess what? In many cases, you can still be in compliance during audits but still meet the criteria of “unsafe but sustainable processes with poor best practices . . . measured by more injuries, more near-misses, and wasteful business processes.”

This is why Question Number 14 on the TapRooT® Root Cause Tree® is so important.

Not every Causal Factor/Significant Issue that occurred during an incident or was found during an audit is due to a person just breaking a rule or taking shortcuts. In many cases, the employee was following the rules to the “T” when the action that the employee performed, got him/her hurt or got someone else hurt.

Take time to use the TapRooT® Root Cause Tree®, Root Cause Tree® Dictionary, and Corrective Action Helper® as designed to perform consistently with a successful purpose.

Want to learn more? Attend one of our public TapRooT® Courses or contact us to schedule an onsite course.

Watch Facebook Live on Wednesdays: Next up is Body Language

March 13th, 2018 by

Be sure to catch TapRooT®’s Facebook Live session on Wednesday, March 14, 2018. TapRooT® Instructor and Nonverbal Communication Expert Barb Phillips and Implementation Strategist Benna Dortch will discuss, among other topics, how to interpret common body language cues.

Where? https://www.facebook.com/RCATapRooT/

When? Wednesday, March 14

What Time? Noon Eastern | 11:00 a.m. Central | 10:00 a.m. Mountain | 9:00 a.m. Pacific

Another recent FB Live sessions features Benna Boring and Ken Reed discussing the top six takeaways attendees said they wanted to incorporate into their companies after attending the 2018 Global TapRooT® Summit. We can’t wait for March 11-15, 2019, for our next Summit near Houston, Texas! Mark your calendars and begin making plans now!

TapRooT® Around the World

March 9th, 2018 by

TapRooT® instructor, Heidi Reed, sent us these photos from a course that she and Barry Baumgardner are teaching at Energy XXI in Grand Isle, LA. Looks like a great group!

 

Want to learn about your onsite course options?

Contact us!

Comments from a TapRooT® Course Participant

February 23rd, 2018 by

Malcolm Gresham, one of our instructors from Australia, sent me this video of a long time TapRooT® User who was attending a course for refresher training. Click the link below to watch a .mov (QuickTime) video.

CourseCritique.mov

Thanks Michael for having the course and you have a great memory! Keep reading the definition! Hope to see you at the Global tapRooT® Summit one of these years!

Technically Speaking – The 2018 TapRooT® Global Summit is Right Around the Corner

February 16th, 2018 by

The TapRooT® Support team is excited to remind you that the 2018 Global TapRooT® Summit is right around the corner with the Pre-Summit classes starting 2/26 and the Summit starting a couple days later on the 2/28. The Summit is a great way to improve your Root Cause Analysis skills, network with fellow TapRooT® users, and see how others use TapRooT® to help reduce the number of incidents at their company. We will have a table out in the Cumberland Concourse and we’d love for you to stop by and say hi!

You can register for the 2018 Global TapRooT® Summit and Pre-Summit here

Gain Team Leader knowledge and experience in our 5-day training

February 13th, 2018 by


The 5-day training course is our “Team Leader” training course. This provides an expert level of knowledge on all of the TapRooT® techniques and on the TapRooT® Software. This course targets those investigators that will be system experts and team leaders and provides the knowledge to manage and utilize the TapRooT® process for any kind of investigation. TapRooT® Software is used throughout the 5 days. When leaving this training course, the investigator will have experience analyzing issues, performing interviews, leading an investigative team, and using the TapRooT® software as an aid and tool.

A great course that will expand your abilities to investigate.
The course not only looks at human performance but equipment failures as well.
~ R. Klahs

Register for an upcoming course:

Monterrey, Mexico – March 5

Charlotte, North Carolina – March 19

New Orleans, Lousiana – April 16

Edmonton, AB Canada – April 23

Las Vegas, Nevada – April 23

 

Carl Dixon returns to the 2018 Global TapRooT® Summit!

February 9th, 2018 by

Carl Dixon, who sang and played with Coney Hatch, April Wine, and The Guess Who, is back at the 2018 Global TapRooT® Summit as the entertainment for our reception. Don’t miss the great music and good times!

Here’s a video from back in the day – Carl and Coney Hatch …

and April Wine …

And here is Carl in 2010 with the Guess Who …

And finally CARL SINGING “No Sugar” with The Guess Who in 2016 …

You’re Invited to Our 30th Anniversary Party!

February 9th, 2018 by

2018 marks an extremely special year for System Improvements Inc., it’s the year we turn 30. So come join us at the Knoxville Summit and help us celebrate three decades of saving lives!

The celebration will start Wednesday March 1 after the 4:00 pm session, and it will be located right outside the main session hall in the Cumberland Concourse. There will be appetizers, drinks, and Carl Dixon will be there for live entertainment.

Don’t forget to bring your tickets! Blue tickets will be distributed for a prize drawing, and you will receive orange tickets for two free drinks. So get ready to eat, drink, and be merry!

To learn more about the Summit click here or email me at roberts@taproot.com. Looking forward to seeing everyone soon.

Audit Prep: A Deeper Look at the Definition of a Significant Issue.

February 1st, 2018 by

Here is Dave Janney taking a deeper look into the definition of a significant issue when preparing for an audit.

Carl Dixon at the 2018 Global TapRooT® Summit Reception

February 1st, 2018 by

You’ve heard rock star Carl Dixon talk at previous Summits about his comeback from a near-fatal car crash. Don’t miss him playing at the 2018 Global TapRooT® Summit!

Root Cause Analysis Tip: Do you perform an incident investigation like you watch the news?

January 31st, 2018 by

If you are like me, you flip channels to see how each news station or news website reports the same issue of interest. Heck, I even look at how different countries discuss the same issue of interest. Take the “Deep Water Horizon Spill of 2010” or was it the “BP Oil Spill of 2010” or was it the “Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill of 2010”? It depends on where you were or what you watched when it was reported. At the end of the day we all often develop Bias Criteria of Trust… often without any true ability to determine which perspective is closer to the truth.

Now there are fancier terms of bias from confirmation bias to hindsight bias, but let’s take a look at some of our news source Bias Criteria of Trust.


So here is the question to stop and ask….. do you do the same thing when you start an investigation, perform root cause analysis or troubleshoot equipment? It is very easy to say YES! We tend to trust interviews and reports using the same criteria above before we actually have the evidence. We also tend to not trust interviews and reports purely because of who and where they came from, without evidence as well!

Knowing this…..

Stop the urge to not trust or to overly trust. Go Out And Look (GOAL) and collect the evidence.

Got your interest? Want to learn more? Feel free to contact me or any of our TapRooT® Instructors at info@taproot.com or call 865.539.2139.

Where Do You Get Ideas To Improve Root Cause Analysis?

4 Signs You Need to Improve Your Investigations

Where Do You Get Ideas To Improve Root Cause Analysis?

January 31st, 2018 by

When I was assigned the job of figuring out how to improve investigations and root cause analysis … I knew that we were NOT finding the causes of human errors. But where would I get ideas to help make things better? The year was 1985 and there wasn’t an easy place to start …

  • no internet
  • no e-mails with upcoming courses
  • no conferences on the topic (maybe one talk at a nuclear industry conference’s breakout session)

I knew that the Institute for Nuclear Power Operations was working on a system because they had tried to hire me to help create it.

So what did I do?

  • Started looking at the human factors research.
  • Networked with the folks I knew at our corporate headquarters, INPO, the University of Illinois, INEL, EPRI, and several utilities where I knew people.
  • Started trying to create a list of causes that encompassed the human factors research that I was familiar with.

This lead to a beginning system to find root causes that, eventually, led to the development of TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis System.

It was a long road with many lessons learned.

In 1988, we started System Improvements to help people improve their root cause analysis systems. In 1990, we won a contract to help the US Nuclear Regulator Commission improve their analysis of human errors. In 1991 we started working with our first oil and chemical company (Chevron) to improve their root cause analysis as part of their efforts to improve process safety. From there our growth into all types of industries with incidents – incidents that need fixes to prevent recurrence based on the real root causes – has been … pretty dramatic.

In 1994 we held the first TapRooT® Summit (not named the Summit until sometime later). It had great speakers and 35 attendees. I cooked steaks for everyone as our closing session.

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 1996 Summit Keynote Speaker with Mark Paradies (left)

Why did we decide to have a summit to focus on root cause analysis and performance improvement? Because I thought that our clients needed it. They needed:

  • a place to learn the latest ways to improve human performance.
  • to network and share best practices they were testing and perfecting.
  • to hear about what we were doing to improve the TapRooT® System.
  • motivation to keep them at the “performance improvement grindstone.”

L M Astronaut

Linda Under and Mark Paradies with 1997 Astronaut Keynote Speaker

Little did I know that this first conference would turn into an annual event that had hundreds of attendees who are some of the smartest people improving industrial safety, quality, patient safety, process safety, asset optimization, and operational excellence from around the world.

Linda1988

Linda Unger with Summit attendee from South Korea in 1998

I would never have guessed that I would draw people from Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, UK, Saudi Arabia, Tanzania, New Zealand, Colombia, Brazil, Canada, Mexico, South Africa, Russia, Denmark, France, and many other countries (even the USA!) to hear what we thought others needed to learn to make their performance great.

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People sharing best practices at the 2016 Global TapRooT® Summit

But it happened. And now, if someone asks:

“Where Do You Get Ideas To Improve Root Cause Analysis?”

The answer is … The Global TapRooT® Summit.

The next Summit is rapidly approaching. Where is it? It is being held in Knoxville, Tennessee, (our hometown) on February 26 – March 2.

Want to find out more about the 10 pre-Summit courses being held on February 26-27? CLICK HERE.

Want to find out more about the blockbuster talks being delivered by the Keynote Speakers? CLICK HERE.

Want to see a list of the Best Practice Presenters? CLICK HERE.

Want to see the schedules for all nine Summit Tracks? CLICK HERE.

But don’t spend too much time clicking. You need to REGISTER ASAP and get your hotel and travel plans finalized because you need to attend this Summit.

Watch this video to see what past Summit attendees have to say…

4 Signs You Need to Improve Your Investigations

January 29th, 2018 by

If you want to improve your root cause analysis beyond simple techniques that yield incomplete results that don’t stop problems, you are probably ready for step one … implementing the TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis System.

But many find that after they implement the TapRooT® System, they still have room to improve their investigations. Here are four signs that you’re ready for step two:

  1. Investigator Bad Habits – Before your investigators were trained to use TapRooT®, they probably had some other method they used to find “the root cause.” The bad habits they learned probably aren’t completely corrected in a single 2-Day or 5-Day TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis Course. They may have previously been trained that there was only one root cause. They might not know how to interview or collect information (facts). They may need practice drawing complete SnapCharT®s or identifying all the Causal Factors. Therefore, they may need more training or some coaching to complete the development of their skills.
  2. Insufficient Time & Resources – Even if you are a great investigator, you need time to collect evidence and complete your investigation. If you have too little time and if you don’t have adequate resources, the TapRooT® Training alone can’t make your investigations excellent.
  3. Inadequate Investigation Review – Investigators need feedback to improve their skills. Where do they get expert feedback? It could come from management if they are experts in root cause analysis. If management doesn’t understand root cause analysis, the feedback they get may not improve future results. Therefore, you should probably implement a “peer review” before management review occurs. The “peer review” will be done by one or more root cause analysis experts to identify areas for improvement BEFORE the investigation is presented to management. The best peer reviews are conducted while the investigation is being performed. Think of this as just-in-time coaching.
  4. Insufficient Practice – Even with great training to start with, people become “rusty” if they don’t practice their skills. Of course, you don’t want to have more serious incidents to get more experience for your investigators. What can you do? Three things … a) Use the TapRooT® System to investigate less serious but potentially serious incident. The new book, Using the Essential TapRooT® Techniques to Investigate Low-to-Medium Risk Incidents, can show you how to do this without wasting time and effort. b) Use the TapRooT® System to prepare for, perform, and analyze the results of audits. Learn how to do this in the upcoming pre-Summit course, TapRooT® for Audits. Or get the book, TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis for Audits and Proactive Performance Improvement. c) Have a refresher course for your investigators (contact us for info by CLICKING HERE) or have them attend a pre-Summit Course and the Global TapRooT® Summit to refresh their skills.

Are you ready for step two? Would you like to learn more about improving your implementation of TapRooT® and changing the culture of your companies investigations and root cause analysis? Then get registered for the 2018 Global TapRooT® Summit.

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FIRST, Mark Paradies, President of System Improvements and TapRooT® author will be giving a keynote address titled: How Good is Your TapRooT® Implementation. Learn how to apply best practices from around the world to improve your use of TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis.

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SECOND, Jack Frost, Vice President HSE of Matrix Service Company, will be giving a Best Practice Track talk titled: Improving Safety Culture Through Measuring and Grading Investigations. In this session he will discuss using an evaluation matrix to grade your investigations and coach your investigators to better root cause analysis.

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You can download the matrix that Jack uses here: http://www.taproot.com/content/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/RateRootCauseAnalysis11414.xlsx.

Don’t be satisfied. Continually improve your root cause analysis!

Have FUN at the 2018 Global TapRooT® Summit!

January 25th, 2018 by

We don’t want the 2018 Global TapRooT® Summit to be boring. We want you to meet smart industry leaders, learn amazing best practices, and have fun!

Learning while having fun is much more effective that trying to stay awake during boring presentations. That’s why we organize the Global TapRooT® Summit to have activities, Keynote Speakers, and sessions that are active and entertaining.

Plus we start with the Name Game and have an excellent Reception on Wednesday.

This year we will again have rock star Carl Dixon as our entertainment at the reception where you can network with the new friends and important contacts that you have established.

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Here’s Carl back in the day playing with April Wine …

And more classic rock from Carl and April Wine …

And just one more …

I think he is even better today. Don’t miss the 2018 Global TapRooT® Summit reception!

What Pre-Summit Course Should I Attend?

January 23rd, 2018 by

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That’s a tough question…

Here is more course info: http://www.taproot.com/taproot-summit/pre-summit-courses

Attending the 2018 Global TapRooT® Summit and a Pre-Summit course is a great way to learn more AND get a discount of $200 off the course.

And if you bring a team to the Summit, you can get discounts up to $600 off per person!

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CLICK HERE to REGISTER!

Safety Fines Double in One Year in UK

January 18th, 2018 by

In the UK, fines related to safety doubled from 2016 to 2017. Here is a video from Safety & Health Practitioner (SHP) that provides more details…

Perhaps now is the time to invest in improved root cause analysis as part of your safety improvement efforts?

CLICK HERE for more information about TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis or CLICK HERE for information about TapRooT® Training.

CLICK HERE to see a list of public TapRooT® Courses in Europe.

CLICK HERE to contact us for information about training at your site.

Why do people try to make root cause analysis so difficult?

January 17th, 2018 by

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I read a comment string on LinkedIn about root cause analysis. People made the concepts and techniques so hard to understand.

First, there was an argument over what is a root cause. One person argued that there was no such thing because EVERY cause had another deeper cause. Someone else argued that there wasn’t a root cause because most incidents had multiple causes. Someone else introduced the idea of root causes, contributing causes, causal factors, and initiating events. Someone else brought up the concept of latent causes and Swiss cheese.

If that wasn’t enough disagreement, another side argument started over what was an incident, and accident, a near-miss, and a significant incident. This lead to a discussion of what needed investigation and how good an investigation was good enough.

At SI, we too had discussions about these topics 30 years ago. However, in the TapRooT® System, these arguments are settled and the terminology is either settled or irrelevant.

Perhaps it is my engineering and Nuclear Navy training that lead me away from philosophical discussions and turned me toward practical solutions to problems.

Perhaps it was my human factors training that made it easy to see why people made mistakes and what we could do to prevent them.

Perhaps it is my ability to take complex subjects and make them understandable that lead to the development of a systematic, practical, repeatable system to find the root causes of problems – the TapRooT® System.

So, if you are tired of debate and just want a system that has been proven around the world to find and fix the root causes of safety, quality, equipment, and production issues, learn about TapRooT® and save lot’s of time by avoiding needless arguments.

CLICK HERE to find out more about our 2-Day and 5-Day TapRooT® Training.

CLICK HERE to see where our upcoming public TapRooT® Training is being held.

Or CLICK HERE to contact us about having a course at your site.

Why are the SMARTEST people going to the 2018 Global TapRooT® Summit?

January 17th, 2018 by

SummitHands

About three Summits ago, I had a Summit attendee come up to me and say:

Mark, it is amazing the quality of speakers and topics you put together for the Summit.
But even more amazing is the networking. The people at this Summit are some of
the smartest people working on real life performance improvement in industry!
I just wanted to tell you thanks for making this happen.

 How do we get such high quality attendees? That’s the kind of people who use TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis to stop accidents, improve quality, reduce risk, and improve equipment reliability.

If you haven’t registered for the 2018 Global TapRooT® Summit yet, GET HOT! Visit the Summit web site and get registered TODAY!

Don’t Miss the TapRooT® Family Reunion

January 17th, 2018 by

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The Global TapRooT® Summit was almost named the TapRooT® Family Reunion. Why? Because that’s the way it feels.

Friendly folks getting together to say hello and get reacquainted.

Unless you belong to a dysfunctional family, you know what I mean.

This family has a common goal. They to share best practices and learn how to achieve outstanding performance. TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis is a part of that effort. But there is so much more to learn and share at the reunion (Summit). And that’s why we sponsor the Summit and spend lavishly on speakers.

We want to provide the opportunity for our best clients to meet face to face, develop relationships, and get new ideas to make safety, quality, equipment reliability, patient and process safety, and productivity even better. And leave the Summit inspired to go back home and make performance great.

The learning that takes place is one of the reasons that we require Certified TapRooT® instructors to attend the Summit at least once every two years. We think that keeping up to date on the latest improvement ideas is that important.

So don’t miss the reunion (the Summit) and your chances to make your performance improvement efforts that much better. Register for the 2018 Global TapRooT® Summit (February 26 – March 2, Knoxville, TN) TODAY by CLICKING HERE.

Time for some advanced root cause analysis?

January 15th, 2018 by

Screen Shot 2018 01 15 at 12 52 39 PM

What do you think? Does someone in the Hawaii government need to attend TapRooT® Training?

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