Root Cause Analysis Blog

 

Now perform your Basic and Major investigations with TapRooT®

Posted: June 27th, 2017 in Investigations, Performance Improvement, TapRooT, Video, Video Depot

TapRooT® is a robust root cause analysis system. When you have those major accidents and need an effective and thorough investigation, TapRooT® is the go-to solution. But what about those smaller, simpler, less complex incidents? Is it worth applying such a complex system for such a simple problem? Well, we think all problems are worth a thorough investigation, but we also realize you can only give up so much time on seemingly less serious incidents. Which is why the folks at TapRooT® decided to make a simpler version of our root cause analysis process so that you can still get the best results in less time.

Check out this video of Ken Reed, TapRooT® instructor and expert, to learn more.

 

7 Traits of a Great Root Cause Analysis Facilitator

Posted: June 27th, 2017 in Investigations, Performance Improvement, Pictures, Root Cause Analysis Tips, Summit, TapRooT

NewImage

After decades of teaching TapRooT® and being consulted about many investigations, I’ve met lots of root cause analysis facilitators. Some were good. Some were not so good. Some were really superior. Some were horrible. Therefore, I thought it might be interesting to relate what I see that separates the best from the rest. Here are the seven traits of the BEST.

1. They don’t jump to conclusions. The worst investigators I’ve seen think they know it all. They already have their mind made up BEFORE the first interview. They START the investigation to prove their point. They already know the corrective action they are going to apply … so all they have to do is affirm that the causes they already have assumed ARE the cause they find.

What do the best investigators do? They start by seeing where the evidence leads them. The evidence includes:

  • Physical evidence, 
  • Paper evidence (documentations),
  • People evidence (interviews), and
  • Recordings (videos/pictures/tapes/computer records).

They are great at collecting evidence without prejudice. They perform “cognitive interviews” to help the interviewee remember as much as possible. (See the new book TapRooT® Evidence Collection and Interviewing Techniques to Sharpen Investigation Skills to learn more about cognitive interviews. The book should be released in August. Get the book with the course being held in November in Houston.) 

The best investigators may have some technical knowledge, but they know when they need help to understand what the evidence is telling them. Therefore, they get technical experts when they need them.

2. They understand What before Why. The worst investigators start by asking WHY? Why did someone make a mistake. Why did the part fail. Why didn’t the guilty party use the procedure. These “why” questions tend to put people on the defensive. People start justifying what they did rather than sharing what they know.

The best investigators start with what and how. They want to understand what happened and how those involved reacted. What did they see as the problem? What were the indications they were observing? Who did they talk to and what did they say? What was happening and in what order did it happen?

People don’t get defensive about what and how questions. They are much more likely to share information and tell the truth. And these what questions help develop an excellent SnapCharT® that helps the root cause analysis facilitator develop a “picture” of what happened.

3. They are not looking for the single root cause. The worst investigators are always looking for THE root cause. The smoking gun. The one thing that caused the problem that can be corrected by a simple corrective action. THE root cause that they are looking for.

The best investigators know that most accidents have multiple things that went wrong. They facilitate their team to understand all the causal factors and how these causal factors came together to cause that particular incident.

These root cause facilitators use their SnapCharT® and Safeguard Analysis to show how the problems came together to cause the incident. This can help show management how latent condition are hidden traps waiting to produce an accident that previously seemed impossible.

4. They dig deeper to find root causes. The worst investigator stop when they identify simple problems. For the worst investigators, HUMAN ERROR is a root cause.

The best investigators know that human error is just a starting point for a root cause analysis. They go beyond equipment failure and beyond human error by using effective investigative techniques that help them go beyond their own knowledge.

For example, if there is an equipment failure they consult the Equifactor® Troubleshooting Tables to find out more about the failure. This helps them get to the bottom of equipment problems. They often find that equipment failures are caused by human error.

For human performance related causal factors they use the Human Performance Troubleshooting Guide of the Root Cause Tree® to help them determine where they need to dig deeper into the causes of human error. 

The best investigators don’t accept false stories. They have a good BS detector because false stories seldom make a sensible SnapCharT®.

5. They find root causes that are fixable. The worst investigators find root causes that management really can’t do anything to prevent. For example, telling people to “try harder” not to make a mistake IS NOT an effective corrective action to stop human errors. 

The best investigators know that their are many ways to improve human performance. They understand that trying harder is important but that it is not a long term solution. They look for human factors related fixes that come from human performance best practices. They know that the Root Cause Tree® can help them find problems with:

  • Procedures
  • Training
  • Quality Control
  • Communications
  • Management Systems
  • Human Engineering
  • Work Direction

And that by implementing best practices related to the root causes they identify, they can reduce the probability of future human errors.

6, They recommend effective corrective actions. The worst investigators recommend the three standard corrective actions for almost every problem:

  1. MORE TRAINING
  2. COUNSELLING (tell them to be more careful and fire them if they get caught making the mistake again)
  3. If you are desperate, WRITE A PROCEDURE

That’ about it.

The best investigators start by understanding the risk represented by the incident. Higher risk incidents deserve higher order corrective actions. The highest order is to remove the Hazard. Other corrective actions may be related to strengthening the Safeguards by implementing human performance best practices. sometimes these corrective action may include training and procedures but that is seldom the only corrective actions recommended.

7. They know what they are doing. The worst investigators don’t really know what they are doing. They haven’t been trained to find root causes or the training they had was superficial at best. (Can you ask “Why?” five times?)

The best investigators are accomplished professionals. They’ve been in advanced root cause analysis training and have practiced what they have learned by performing many simple investigations before they were asked to jump into a major investigation. Even if they have several major investigations under their belt, they continue to practice their root cause analysis skills on simple investigations and on proactive audits and assessments. 

Beyond practicing their skills, they attend the only worldwide summit focused on root cause analysis and investigation facilitation – The Global TapRooT® Summit. At the Summit they benchmark their skills with other facilitators from around the world and share best practices. Think of this as steel sharpening steel. 

GOOD NEWS. The knowledge and skills that make the best investigators the best … CAN BE LEARNED.

Where? Have a look at these courses:

http://www.taproot.com/courses

And then plan to attend the 2018 Global TapRooT® Summit in Knoxville, Tennessee, on February 26 – March 2 to sharpen your skills (or have those who work for you sharpen their skills).

NewImage

TapRooT® Around the World: Cape Town, South Africa

Posted: June 27th, 2017 in Courses, Pictures

TapRooT® is taught and used all over the world as a root cause analysis solution. Check out this great group in South Africa last week!

Interested in bringing TapRooT® to your company for training? Inquire here.

Interested in sending your team to a TapRooT® course? Check our course schedule here.

 

Monday Motivation: A Better Workday (in Less than Ten Minutes!)

Posted: June 26th, 2017 in Wisdom Quote

“As I’ve always said,” Robbins said, “If you don’t have 10 minutes, you don’t have a life.”

We highlighted how what we think affects our success a couple of weeks ago, and this post is in line with that.  However, today we are highlighting tips you can easily put into practice. Tony Robbins has a quick formula for that and it will only take 9 minutes of your day.  It includes gratitude, solving obstacles, and visualizing the things you want to happen in your life.

Learn about it here:  The 9 Minute Morning Meditation Tony Robbins Swears By

Monday Accident and Lessons Learned: Train Collision at Preston Station

Posted: June 26th, 2017 in Accidents, Pictures

A train traveling from York to Blackpool North at about 6 mph collided with the buffer stop in platform 3C at Preston station. The buffer stop is a part of the Preston platform that allows the train driver to slow down in enough time.

The camera footage from the station showed the train essentially hit the brakes quickly upon approaching the buffer stop causing the inevitable collision. Fortunately there were no fatalities, however two crew members and thirteen passengers reported injuries.

So, what happened? The report states the operator was a trainee being supervised. When approaching the platform, the trainee was trained and advised to operate the brake controller but accidentally operated the power controller instead. But was it his fault? The supervisors?

At TapRooT® we believe and teach a blame-free philosophy. Firing or reprimanding the trainee or trainer wouldn’t ultimately fix what happened or prevent it from recurring.

(Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/safety-digest-102017-preston/passenger-train-collision-with-buffer-stop-at-preston-station-1-april-2017)

Top 10 Reasons People Don’t Use TapRooT®

Posted: June 23rd, 2017 in Jokes, Pictures, TapRooT

10. Why do a root cause analysis when you can just discipline people.

9. Job security – they want more incidents to investigate.

8. They learned a system back in the 60’s and why should they try anything new.

7. Their company has no mistakes to investigate.

6. They don’t like tapping noises.

5. They would rather use their massive brainpower.

4. They are trying to get fired.

3. They just say that everything is human error.

2. They don’t grow trees.

1. They use Spin-A-Cause.

NewImage

Root Cause Tip: Accountability NI

Posted: June 23rd, 2017 in Root Cause Analysis Tips

Growing up as a child, it was common to hear and sometimes say, “You’re not the boss of me!”

There always seemed to be some challenges to parents, teachers and friends, as we started to develop our independence. Somewhere through this journey of life however, we soon started to hear our peers and some cases out of our own mouths…

In other words, “I’m not in charge” and “I’m not the boss.”
Many people started wanting to give up responsibility as they get more responsibility.

  • I’m not the boss
  • I don’t get paid enough to make the decision
  • It’s their equipment, they should know how to operate it safely
  • That’s outside my job description

The issue of not really knowing who is in charge is commonplace in many of the incidents that I have reviewed. In TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis, we define accountability as ensuring that the person who is in charge of the working being done knows he/she is in charge and coworkers/management know that person is in charge. When many different companies with different functional roles work together, the more susceptible the work being performed is to the root cause of Accountability Needs Improvement.

Take the following work environments and think about what issues have or could arise…

Operation Room: Company A Surgeon, Company B Anesthesiologist, Local Hospital RN Nurses, Company C X-Ray Technician…

Deepwater Ocean Rig: Company A Operator, Company B Owner, Company C System Vendor Technician…

Construction Site: Company A Crane Operator, Company B Crane Rental Mechanic, Company C Labor, Property Owner, Company D Project Planner…

Here are a few best practices to help when performing the actual work:

1. At the beginning of each job, people introduce themselves and their role during the work to be performed that day. This gives each person a voice and role.

2. Client supervisors that must perform Tailboard and JSA meetings at the beginning of each job should familiarize themselves with the energy and line of fire danger areas for all equipment on site. Even if it is equipment used by contractors. The contractor also has a role to educate the client and other contractors in the area.

3. All people performing the task should discuss possible issues that may occur and what would require work stop and actions to follow when possible. Learn more about this concept of Crew Resource Management in our 5-Day Team Leader Course.

Remember, we all have a role to perform during a task. If roles are not defined and there is no clear sign of true accountability, that task may not get done, get done incorrectly and there will be no one with the right knowledge to stop the work when issues occur.

Technically Speaking – Web Store Ordering Assistance

Posted: June 22nd, 2017 in Software, Technical Support, Technically Speaking

Have you ever tried to go to our store and had trouble ordering a product? Maybe you’ve seen the login area and wondered “how do I get a login?”

Well, I wanted to let you know we’re here for you. Should you have any Technical issues placing an order on the store, don’t hesitate to reach out to us via phone at 865-357-0080 or if you can’t call, send a quick email to support@taproot.com. We’ll be glad to walk you through the product ordering process and answer any technical questions you may have regarding our site. Don’t worry, there is no need for you to have to make a payment with us over the phone. You can make the payment on our site using our secure server.

Technically Speaking is a weekly series that highlights various aspects of the TapRooT® VI software and occasionally includes a little Help Desk humor. Remember, just because it’s technical, doesn’t mean it has to be complicated!

Six Sigma: Better Root Cause Analysis and Corrective Actions

Posted: June 22nd, 2017 in Performance Improvement, Quality, Root Cause Analysis Tips

I remember first learning about root cause analysis during Six Sigma training. The main methods we used were 5 Whys and Fishbone diagrams, but somehow we had a hard time arriving at good corrective actions. It took time and testing to get there, and still the fixes were not always robust.

Since then, I have learned a lot more about RCA. Unguided deductive reasoning tools like 5 Whys or Fishbones rely heavily on the knowledge and experience of the investigator. Since nobody can be an expert in every contributing field, this leads to investigator bias. Or, as the old adage goes: “If a hammer is your only tool, all your problems will start looking like nails”.

Other issues with deductive reasoning are investigations identifying only single causes (when in reality there are several), or ignorance of generic root causes that have broader quality impacts. Results will also be inconsistent; if several teams analyze the same issue, results can be wildly divergent. Which one is correct? All of them? None?

This is where the TapRooT® methodology has benefits over other tools. It is an expert system that guides investigators to look at a range of potential causal factors, like human engineering, management systems and procedures. There are no iterations of hypotheses to prove or disprove so investigator bias is not a problem.

The process is repeatable, identifies all specific and generic causes and guides the formulation of strong corrective actions. It is centered on humans, systems and processes, and the decisions they make every day.

The supporting TapRooT® Software is designed to enable investigators to keep efforts focused and organized:

  1. define the problem in a SnapCharT®
  2. identify Causal Factors and Root Causes with the Root Cause Tree®, and
  3. formulate sustainable corrective actions using the Corrective Action Helper® module

The TapRooT® process avoids blame, is easy to learn and quickly improves root cause analysis outcomes.

In Six Sigma parlance, the SnapCharT® is used for problem definition (Define), the Root Cause Tree® and trending for root cause identification (Measure and Analyze), and the corrective action process to define effective fixes (Improve).

#TapRooT_RCA

Interviewing and Evidence Collection: How to Package Physical Evidence

Posted: June 21st, 2017 in Investigations, Root Cause Analysis Tips

Hello and welcome to this week’s column focused on interviewing and evidence collection for root cause analysis of workplace incidents and accidents.  We refer to four basic categories of evidence in our Interviewing & Evidence Techniques training:

  1. People
  2. Paper
  3. Physical
  4. Recordings

Some investigations only require evidence that does not need special packaging such as training records, policies and procedures (paper evidence) and/or interviews of the people who were there (people evidence). While a workplace investigation is not the same as a criminal investigation where physical evidence often requires forensic examination, there are definitely situations where collecting physical evidence is helpful to the root cause investigation.  Here are a few basic tips:

Packaging: Most physical evidence can be stored in paper containers, like envelopes and boxes. There is a plethora of websites that sell packaging material designed specifically for evidence. Wet evidence (such as fabric) should be air dried before packaging because moisture causes rapid deterioration and risks environmental contamination, like mold.   Allow wet evidence to dry thoroughly and then package it. Then store the evidence at room temperature. If the item is not wet and does not need to “breathe” (for example, the evidence is a collection of bolts), you can also use plastic containers for storage.

Sharp objects:  Package sharp objects in a way to ensure the safety of those handling it.  Packaging may include metal cans, plastic or hard cardboard boxes so long as the object will not protrude.

Size: Ensure the packaging is of adequate size. If the packaging is too small for the item, it may fail over time.  If it’s too large, it could become damaged when it moves around the container.

Avoid using staples to seal evidence envelopes:  Staples can damage the evidence.  Tape across the entire flap of an envelope to seal it.

Don’t forget to tag and mark evidence containers so that you will be able to easily identify what is stored in each container at a later date.

If you’re interested in learning more about Interviewing & Evidence Collection, I hope you will join me in Houston, Texas in November for a 3-day root cause analysis + interviewing and evidence collection course or 1-day  interviewing and evidence collection training.

What does a bad day look like?

Posted: June 20th, 2017 in Accidents

It looks like when Aunt Carol shows up.

How do you plan your root cause analysis?

Posted: June 20th, 2017 in Investigations, Pictures, Root Cause Analysis Tips, TapRooT

NewImage

General George Patton said:

“A good plan today is better than a perfect plan tomorrow.”

But for many investigations, I might ask … Do you have any plan at all?

NewImage

Copyright © 2016 by System Improvements, Inc. Duplication prohibited. Used by permission.

Planning is the first step in the TapRooT® 7-Step Major Investigation Process. We even recommend a simple plan for simple investigations.

You may have read the earlier article about using a SnapCharT® to plan your investigation (see: http://www.taproot.com/archives/58488)

What else can help you plan your investigation? Here’s a list:

  • Have an investigation policy that specifies team make up and other factors that can be predefined.
  • Make sure that people on the scene are trained to preserve evidence and to obtain witness statements.
  • Consider PPE requirements for team members visiting the scene.
  • Collect any recorded evidence (cell phone recordings).
  • Maintain a chain of custody for evidence.
  • Do you need legal or PR assistance for your team?

That’s just a few ideas. There is a whole chapter about planning in the new book: TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis for Major Investigations.

When you order the new book you will also get the latest copies of theRoot Cause Tree®, the Root Cause Tree® Dictionary, and the Corrective Action Helper® Guide – all of which were recently updated.

Order your copy by CLICKING HERE.

Monday Accident and Lessons Learned: Incorrect Pressure Gauge

Posted: June 19th, 2017 in Accidents, Investigations

Incorrect Pressure Gauge

Correct Pressure Gauge

The IOGP recently released that in September 2015, the incorrect pressure gauge was used on a high pressure supply line causing a high pressure release. When investigating, they found that the two gauges are identical in appearance, were stored in the same place and were stored in the incorrect place for convenience purposes. What are the corrective actions? Better storage of all pressure gauges, check all gauges before installing them, and check all current gauges to ensure they are being used correctly.

What are your thoughts on this incident? The investigation? The corrective actions?

(Resource: IOGP Safety Alerts)

Monday Motivation: Making a Difference

Posted: June 19th, 2017 in Career Development, Career Development Tips, Wisdom Quote

When trying to come up with a list of goals for yourself, why not start by answering the question: “What kind of difference do I want to make with my life?”

“Anyone who thinks that they are too small to make a difference has never tried to fall asleep with a mosquito in the room.” Christine Todd Whitman

With most of the great men and woman of history, making money or finding fame was not their primary goal. They wanted their life to have real meaning.

Experts say the desire to make a difference seems to have affected how successful they really were to accomplish their mission. Albert Schweitzer, one of the greatest humanitarians in history, is but one example. At 30, Schweitzer was a world-famous organist, specializing in compositions by Bach. It was during this time that he began thinking about making a greater difference with his life. He read a report on dismal conditions facing Africans in the Congo (now the Republic of Zaire) and decided to become a missionary surgeon.

“When it’s obvious that the goals cannot be reached, don’t adjust the goals, but the action steps. Confucius

Schweitzer returned to school and spent eight years earning a degree in tropical medicine and he played concerts on the side to help raise money. At 38, he loaded his medical supplies on a ship and sailed for Africa. He transferred his supplies to a small boat and traveled up the Ogooue River to a thatched village called Lambarene. There, Schweitzer established a hospital in the only building available: an old chicken coop.

“Bee to the flower, moth to the flame; Each to his passion; what’s in a name?” Helen Hunt Jackson

Within nine months of arriving in Lambarene, he treated more than 2,000 people who had never before had any access to modern health care. Albert Schweitzer continued his work there for some 50 years, fighting everything from leprosy to sleeping sickness. His compassion, dedication, commitment and vision earned him the Nobel peace Prize in 1952. He used the $33,000.00 to expand his hospital and build a leper colony. When he died at the age of 92, his village had grown to 1,500 patients and 40 doctors and specialists.

Andrew Carnegie was also a man on a mission that was much greater and larger than him. The steel magnate started out as a penniless day-laborer in a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania steel plant (my home town and home to the six-time Super Bowl Champions Steelers), but he eventually became the richest man in the world – he sold his steel interests at the turn of the century for 480 million dollars.

“A hero is someone who has given his or her life to something bigger than oneself.” Joseph Campbell

To become rich was only half of his goal. Throughout his life, Carnegie’s main goal was to spend the first part of his life making a lot of money and the second part spent giving it all away. As early as 1868, he wrote himself a letter spelling out his goals, including a plan to resign from business by age 35 and live on an income of $50,000.00 a year.

Carnegie planned to devote the reminder of his money to various philanthropic causes and most of his time to education. He lasted in business almost 30 years longer than he planned, but as he saw it, the staggering wealth he was acquiring for his philanthropic purposes was well worth it.

“Never respect men for their riches, but rather than for their philanthropy; we do not value the sun for its height, but for its use.” Gamaliel Bailey

After the sale of his business interests, he built thousands of libraries and set up foundations to help people learn what they needed to be successful and fulfilled.

By the time of his passing in 1919 at the age of 84, Andrew Carnegie had given away nearly all his fortune.

Making a difference in other people’s lives and hence, your own, will help you find the “Meaning of Life.” The “Meaning of life” is a seven letter acronym. Those of you who had me as an instructor, or have heard me at one of my speaking engagements, probably remember the acronym. The acronym contains several principles that everybody can achieve; to be meaningful and relevant, each person must seek it and accomplish it on their own. Want to know more? You will have to contact me to find out – but I will not just “give” you the answer, because the acronym means different things to different people. Like many people in my life did for me, I’ll share how they taught me to fish for a lifetime; they didn’t give me a fish for a day.

“Each man must look at himself to teach him the meaning of life. It is not something discovered, it is something molded.” Antoine de Saint-Exupery

How many people have made a difference in your life? Do you know who they are? Have you ever taken the time to thank them? More importantly, have you been and are you now taking the legacy they gave you and making a difference in other people lives?

There are hundreds of people who helped me before my plane crash and injuries in 1970 and the hundreds since then who helped me to get back on my feet, continue on my journey and helped me find Meaning in Life. I acknowledged as many as possible in two of my books, “The Bridge Never Crossed – A Survivor’s Search for Meaning” and “Laugh You Live Cry You Die – A Burn Survivor’s Triumph Over Tragedy.” Each person in my life played a major factor in who I am today. Whatever success I’ve achieved, I owe to each one of them. I hope they know how much they meant and mean to me and how much I love(ed) and honor(ed) them. Throughout my life, I’ve tried to show them and tell them.

“I thank you God for this most amazing day, for the leaping greenly spirits of trees, and for the blue dreams of sky and for everything which is natural, which is infinite, which is yes.” e.e. cummings

I read somewhere that our memory is an indication of the kind of life we’ve lived. If this is true, and I think it is, then I’ve been Blessed to have lived a good life.

Throughout my life’s journey, I’ve ‘’gazed’ at the Headstones of the many who’ve passed and who played a major role in my life from birth to now and I think of the friends and hosts who’ve enriched me…. and who remain vertical…. the quote at the end of the movie, “Saving Private Ryan” rings in my head: “I hope I’m a good man. I hope I’ve lived a good life. I hope I’ve earned it!” Me, too!

“A whole stack of memories is never equal to one little hope. Charles M. Schulz

This article was reprinted with permission from the author, Captain George Burk, USAF (Ret), Plane crash, burn survivor, motivational speaker, author, writer. Visit his website at www.georgeburk.com  or contact Captain Burk at gburk@georgeburk.com.

Friday Joke: Which book are you reading from?

Posted: June 16th, 2017 in Jokes

Even better: which book is your boss reading from?

(Credit: John Deckmann)

Troubleshooting and Root Cause Analysis Issues Keep Military from Finding and Fixing the Causes of Oxygen Issues on Military Aircraft

Posted: June 15th, 2017 in Accidents, Current Events, Investigations, Performance Improvement, Pictures, TapRooT, Training

NewImage

Let me start by saying that when you have good troubleshooting and good root cause analysis, you fix problems and stop having repeat incidents. Thus, a failure to stop problems by developing effective corrective actions is an indication of poor troubleshooting and bad root cause analysis.

Reading an article in Flight Global, I decided that the military must have poor troubleshooting and bad root cause analysis. Why? Because Vice Admiral Groskiags testified to congress that:

“We’re not doing well on the diagnosis,” Grosklags told senators this week.
“To date, we have been unable to find any smoking guns.”

 What aircraft are affected? It seems there are a variety of problems with the F/A-18, T-45, F-35. F-22, and T-45. The article above is about Navy and Marine Corps problems but Air Force jets have experience problems as well.

Don’t wait for your problems to become operation critical. Improve your troubleshooting and root cause analysis NOW! Read about our 5-Day TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Course HERE.

Flint Water Crisis: 5 Michigan Officials Charged with Involuntary Manslaughter

Posted: June 15th, 2017 in Accidents, Investigations

 

Yesterday, five Michigan officials were charged with involuntary manslaughter related to the Flint, Michigan water crisis. Recall that in 2014, Flint switched its water source from Detroit to the Flint River in part to save money. It didn’t take long before residents noticed a difference in the way their water tasted and smelled.  The water caused some residents to get life-threatening Legionnaires disease and the medical community identified higher levels of lead in children’s blood (this type of exposure to lead can lead to developmental issues).

Learn more on NPR.

News stories like this are tragic because they are avoidable.  TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis shifts thinking from ineffective blame to effective solutions.  TapRooT® can be used proactively too to avoid these types of devastating problems from ever happening.

Learn more in our 2-day or 5-day root cause analysis courses.

 

Technically Speaking – Customizing TapRooT® VI with a Company Logo

Posted: June 15th, 2017 in Software, Technical Support, Technically Speaking

This week in Technically Speaking we are going to go over adding custom company banners to the TapRooT® VI website as well as, adding them to the custom reports page. Let’s start by adding the company logo to the web page.  This is added in the Admin section. From the Home page, click on the Admin tab.

Now, this takes us to the My Settings page.  On the left side of the page, you will see Company Profile link to click on.

The company profile page is where you configure the company details, site settings and upload the company related logos. At the bottom of this page, you will find the Upload company related logos section.

In this section, you will see Banner Logo Report Logo. Once uploaded the logo will always appear in the upper right-hand corner of the page. The report logo will show on all reports created with the report builder and all reports templates.  Let’s upload a banner logo first. Click on the Choose File button. This will bring up a windows file explorer page(shown in the picture below). Locate the image and select the open button on the bottom right corner.

Once the open button is selected, you should notice that the name of the file chosen will appear in the banner logo box.

You can now hit Apply Changes as shown above for the changes to take effect.  The page will refresh and the logo you uploaded will be in the top right of the screen next to the username that is logged into the system.

This image can be changed, removed, or previewed by going to the same section Upload company related logos.

Now that the company logo is on the web page, let’s move on to the report banner. Go back to the Upload company related logos section and select choose file next to Report Logo. This will be the same process as the Banner Logo we did before. Select Choose File and open the image you wish to see on the reports.  Select Apply Changes at the bottom and you will now see that you are able to Change, Remove, or Preview both the banner logo and the report logo.

Now we can open an investigation and build a report with the company logo on our customized report.

This makes both the website and reports unique to the company. This is just a couple of many customizable features offered in the TapRooT® VI software! Please stay tuned each week for more Technically Speaking blogs and videos highlighting the features in the software each week!

Technically Speaking is a weekly series that highlights various aspects of the TapRooT® VI software and occasionally includes a little Help Desk humor. Remember, just because it’s technical, doesn’t mean it has to be complicated!

 

 

 

Connect with Us

Filter News

Search News

Authors

Angie ComerAngie Comer

Software

Barb PhillipsBarb Phillips

Editorial Director

Chris ValleeChris Vallee

Six Sigma

Dan VerlindeDan Verlinde

VP, Software

Dave JanneyDave Janney

Safety & Quality

Gabby MillerGabby Miller

Marketing

Garrett BoydGarrett Boyd

Technical Support

Ken ReedKen Reed

VP, Equifactor®

Linda UngerLinda Unger

Co-Founder

Mark ParadiesMark Paradies

Creator of TapRooT®

Per OhstromPer Ohstrom

VP, Sales

Shaun BakerShaun Baker

Technical Support

Steve RaycraftSteve Raycraft

Technical Support

Wayne BrownWayne Brown

Technical Support

Success Stories

We held our first on-site TapRooT Training in mid-1995. Shortly after the training we had another…

Intel

In 2002, we decided that to reduce accidents, prevent…

Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority
Contact Us