Root Cause Analysis Blog

 

Career Opportunities for Candidates with TapRooT® Skills

Posted: April 2nd, 2018 in Career Development, Job Postings

Your expertise is your point person. Professional training and skill sets in investigation, problem-solving, and root cause analysis will communicate competency to the potential employer across the desk from you. If you have TapRooT® training and skills, step into a new career through one of these global opportunities.

Senior Process Engineer

Manager – EHS/Quality

Electrical Engineer

QHSSE Advisor

Field Service Manager

Safety and Health Specialist

Becoming TapRooT® trained in troubleshooting and identifying root causes of issues and incidents is clearly the proven path to develop your skill sets and training. Pursue your goals through these TapRooT® courses to advance your professional development.

Houston, TX, April 9, 2018, 2-Day TapRooT® Techniques

Wilmington, DE, April 11, 2018, 2-Day TapRooT® Techniques

Brisbane, Australia, April 16, 2018, 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Training

Las Vegas, NV, April 23, 2018, 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Training

Sao Paulo, Brazil, May 23, 2018, 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Training

Bogota, Colombia, May 28, 2018, 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Training

Perth, Australia, May 30, 2018, 2-Day TapRooT® Techniques

Singapore, Singapore, June 11, 2018, 2-Day TapRooT® Techniques

Monday Accidents & Lessons Learned: When a snake leads you down a rabbit hole

Posted: April 2nd, 2018 in Accidents, investigation

While Lewis Carroll did not create the rabbit hole, he did turn those holes into a literal abyss down which people could fall. Today, “rabbit hole” has become a metaphor for extreme diversion, redirection, or distraction. Industries spiral down them all the time, resulting in a talespin that, sometimes, cannot be rerouted.

A Captain experienced a unique problem during the pre-departure phase of a flight. Within earshot of passengers, the Gate Agent briefed the Captain, “I am required to inform you that while cleaning the cockpit, the cleaning crew saw a snake under the Captain’s pedals. The snake got away, and they have not been able to find it.”

The incident report from NASA’s Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) details the Captain’s response and reaction: “At this time, the [international pre-departure] inspection was complete, and I was allowed on the aircraft. I found two mechanics in the flight deck. I was informed that they had not been able to find the snake, and they were not able to say with certainty what species of snake it was. The logbook had not been annotated with a write-up, so I placed a write-up in the logbook. I was also getting a line check on this flight. The Check Airman told me that his father was deathly afraid of snakes and suggested that some passengers on the flight may suffer with the same condition.

“I contacted Dispatch and discussed with them that I was uncomfortable taking the aircraft with an unknown reptile condition. . . . The possibility [existed] that a snake could expose itself in flight or, worse on the approach, come out from under the rudder pedals. Dispatch agreed with my position. The Gate Agent then asked to board the aircraft. I said, “No,” as we might be changing aircraft. I then contacted the Chief Pilot. I explained the situation and told him I was uncomfortable flying the aircraft without determining what the condition of the snake was. I had specifically asked if the cleaning crew had really seen a snake. I was informed, yes, that they had tried to vacuum it up and it had slithered away. The Chief Pilot agreed with me and told me he would have a new aircraft for us in five minutes. We were assigned the aircraft at the gate next door.

“. . . When I returned [to the airport], I asked a Gate Agent what had happened to the “snake airplane.” I was told that the aircraft was left in service, and the next Captain had been asked to sign some type of form stating he was informed that the snake had not been found.”

Don’t wait for a snake-in-the-cockpit experience to improve your processes. Reach out to TapRooT® to curtail rabbit holes and leave nothing to chance.

Friday joke

Posted: March 30th, 2018 in Jokes

Effective Listening Skills Inventory for Investigative Interviews

Posted: March 29th, 2018 in Career Development Tips, Human Performance, Investigations, Performance Improvement, Topic of the Week

Do you ever interrupt someone because you fear “losing” what you want to say? Do you become momentarily engrossed in your thoughts, then return to reality to find someone awaiting your answer to a question you didn’t hear? Most of us are at fault for interrupting or being distracted from time to time. Particularly, though, in an interview environment where focus is key, distractions or interruptions can be detrimental to the interview.

Watch, listen, learn from this week’s conversation between Barb Carr and Benna Dortch:

Effective Listening Skills Inventory For Investigation Interviews from TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis on Vimeo.

Now, learn how to inventory your listening skills. Internalizing suggestions can recalibrate your thought and communication processes. Your work and your communication style will reflect the changes you’ve made.

Feel free to comment or ask questions on Facebook. We will respond!

Bring your lunch next Wednesday and join TapRooT®’s Facebook Live session. You’ll pick up valuable, workplace-relevant takeaways from an in-depth discussion between TapRooT® professionals. We’ll be delighted to have your company.

Here’s the scoop for tuning in next week:

Where? https://www.facebook.com/RCATapRooT/

When? Wednesday, April 4, 2018

What Time? Noon Eastern | 11:00 a.m. Central | 10:00 a.m. Mountain | 9:00 a.m. Pacific

Thank you for joining us!

Take TapRooT® in Brisbane

Posted: March 29th, 2018 in Career Development, Courses, Local Attractions

Spend two days with TapRooT® Training in Brisbane and gain expertise and perspective in workplace situations. Learn to find and fix the root causes of incidents, accidents, quality problems, near-misses, operational errors, hospital sentinel events, and many other categories of problems.

At the completion of your course, you’ll receive a certificate and a 90-day subscription to TapRooT® VI, the online software service. Importantly, you will have the advantage of professional training in your expertise and on your resume!

While you’re in Brisbane, get to know your host city. Referred to by locals as “Brizzie,” Brisbane is the capital of Queensland, or the “Sunshine State.” Here, you are surrounded by misty blue hills in a city situated by the Brisbane River. Explore Brisbane culture through open-air dining experiences, wander the botanic garden, go in-line skating or biking along riverfront pathways, ferry the river on a CityCat, or check out North Stradbroke and Moreton islands. History fact: Brisbane was the busiest submarine port in the world during World War II. When you’re making plans or while you are there, be sure to use our Brisbane Pinterest board to discover adventures, dining and coffee spots, and city sights.

Attendees should bring safety incidents or quality issues from their work environment to use in a team exercise. These may be written reports, or course participants may share knowledge of an incident without a written report. We’ll divide into teams of 2-4 people, with each team analyzing a unique problem.

Advance your professional development through TapRooT® Training: Register for a two-day, game-changing experience in Brisbane.

May 22, 2018, Brisbane, Australia: 2-Day TapRooT® Techniques

July 16, 2018, Brisbane, Australia: 2-Day TapRooT® Techniques

September 4, 2018, Brisbane, Australia: 2-Day TapRooT® Techniques

Technically Speaking – SnapCharT® Tips

Posted: March 29th, 2018 in TapRooT, Technical Support, Technically Speaking

Does that picture ever represent you after completing an exhaustive SnapCharT®? If not, we listed a few resources to help you master the SnapCharT® tool in TapRooT® VI.

Tips For Building a SnapCharT®

SnapCharT® Versions

SnapCaps

Technically Speaking is a weekly series that highlights various aspects of the TapRooT® VI software and occasionally includes a little Help Desk humor.

Remember, just because it’s technical, it doesn’t mean it has to be complicated!

Technically Speaking – Helpdesk Humor

Posted: March 29th, 2018 in Software, Technical Support, Technically Speaking

 

Where’s the water? Maybe this Root Cause is “missed required training.” Find out by taking one of our course found HERE.

Technically Speaking is a weekly series that highlights various aspects of the TapRooT® VI software and occasionally includes a little Help Desk humor. Remember, just because it’s technical, doesn’t mean it has to be complicated!

Active Listening Inventory

Posted: March 28th, 2018 in Career Development, Root Cause Analysis Tips, Topic of the Week

Are you a good listener? No one is born that way. Listening is a learned skill and practice makes perfect. Read through the following inventory statements and check for areas where you can improve your skills.

1. I listen without interrupting or finishing another’s sentences.
2. I am comfortable with long pauses in conversation.
3. I don’t “tune-out.”
4. I avoid distractions when listening.
5. I respond appropriately when someone is talking to let them know I am listening.
6. I am patient.
7. When someone is speaking, I am listening and not thinking of my next question or comment.
8. I am aware of my non-verbal messages as well as those displayed by others.

Who Invented Operational Excellence?

Posted: March 28th, 2018 in Documents, Performance Improvement, Pictures, Quality

Who Invented Operational Excellence?

Admiral Hyman G. Rickover

NewImage

As a Navy Nuclear Power trained officer, I experienced the rigors of achieving operational excellence first hand.

Rickover explained that there were a series of principles that helped the Nuclear Navy achieve excellence but the top three were:

  1. Total Responsibility
  2. Technical Competence
  3. Facing the Facts

Read about these three principles in a series of articles that I wrote:

http://www.taproot.com/archives/54027

 Rickover lived out this quote:

NewImage

He fought against the lax standards that the Navy practiced and implemented a system of excellence to run the Navy’s nuclear reactors.

You might think that he would be praised and lauded by the Navy for his success. Instead, he had to fight every inch of the way to steer a course true to his principles. And the oldest Admiral ever was fired by the youngest Secretary of the Navy ever. Sometimes that’s how Washington politics works.

Want to read more about Rickover’s life and how he developed his concepts of operational/process excellence? Read his semi-official biography (written by the official Nuclear Navy historian Francis Duncan) Rickover – The Struggle for Excellence. (Picture of the book at the top of the page.)

Learn TapRooT® in Sao Paulo: May 21 – 25

Posted: March 28th, 2018 in Career Development, Courses, Local Attractions

Spend five days in fascinating Sao Paulo, Brazil, with TapRooT®! You will learn to find and fix the root causes of incidents, accidents, quality problems, near-misses, operational errors, hospital sentinel events, and many other categories of problems. Among the unique TapRooT® techniques, you’ll work with SnapCharT®, Root Cause Tree® & Corrective Action Helper®, plus additional advanced topics such as CHAP, Human Engineering, Interviewing, Safeguard Analysis, and Proactive Improvement.

At course completion, attendees will receive a certificate and a 90-day subscription to TapRooT® VI, the online software service. Importantly, you will have the advantage of professional training in your expertise and on your resume!

The 5-Day TapRooT® course location will offer out-the-door convenience to Sao Paulo’s local highlights. Go for a refreshing walk in Ibirapuera Park. Be sure to browse and discover gems to explore on our Sao Paulo Pinterest board. Culture note: A person born in Sao Paulo state is called a paulista; someone born in the city is a paulistano.

Attendees should bring safety incidents or quality issues from their work environment to use in a team exercise. These may be either written reports or, alternately, course participants may share knowledge of an incident without a written report. We will divide into teams of 2-4 people, with each team analyzing a unique problem.

To advance your professional development through TapRooT® training, register here for Sao Paulo.

Have Wednesday lunch with us: Watch Facebook Live today

Posted: March 28th, 2018 in Career Development, Career Development Tips, Video

Be sure to catch TapRooT®’s Facebook Live session today. You’ll be joining TapRooT®’s VP Ken Reed and Implementation Strategist Benna Boring as they bring you a workplace-relevant topic with takeaways.

Where? https://www.facebook.com/RCATapRooT/

When? Today, Wednesday, March 28

What Time? Noon Eastern | 11:00 a.m. Central | 10:00 a.m. Mountain | 9:00 a.m. Pacific

If you missed last week’s FB Live session, featuring Benna Boring and Ken Reed discussing Staying Proficient, tune in to incorporate great takeaways. Be sure to watch TapRooT®’s Facebook Live next week for another terrific discussion and for news you can use.

NOTE: Save the date for 2019 Global TapRooT® Summit: March 11-15, in Houston, TX (La Torretta Lake Resort)!

Wednesday’s Watch: TapRooT® on Facebook Live (Noon, EST)

Posted: March 27th, 2018 in Career Development, Career Development Tips, Video

Be sure to catch TapRooT®’s Facebook Live session tomorrow, Wednesday, March 28. Join TapRooT®’s VP Ken Reed and Implementation Strategist Benna Boring as they bring you a workplace-relevant topic with takeaways.

Where? https://www.facebook.com/RCATapRooT/

When? Wednesday, March 28

What Time? Noon Eastern | 11:00 a.m. Central | 10:00 a.m. Mountain | 9:00 a.m. Pacific

If you missed last week’s FB Live session, featuring Benna Boring and Ken Reed discussing Staying Proficient, tune in to incorporate great takeaways. Be sure to watch TapRooT®’s Facebook Live next week for another terrific discussion and for news you can use.

NOTE: Save the date for 2019 Global TapRooT® Summit: March 11-15, in Houston, TX (La Torretta Lake Resort)!

Testimonial Tuesday

Posted: March 27th, 2018 in Courses, Training

Here are recent evaluations from our 5-Day and 2-Day Root Cause Analysis Courses:

  • “Site uses corrective action software that has (SMARTER) fields built in that make actions easier to track.” – Kelle
  • “I will come away a better investigator. I feel confident in the process I need to follow to help find the true root cause.” – Orrin
  • “Will definitely improve my incident investigations.” – Ryan
  • “Opened my eyes to many more root causes.” – Twila
  • “Much more interactive than other courses I have taken.” – Todd
  • “I like how the process weeds out the upfront debates that slow down and complicate the process.” – Rob

We take your course evaluations seriously. Without them, we couldn’t continue to improve and grow as a company. So, thank you for your valuable feedback!

Looking to attend a course near you? Then click on the link below to see what courses are available near you.

2-Day Essentials TapRooT® Training
5-Day Advanced Root Cause Analysis TapRooT® Training

McD’s in UK Fined £200k for Employee Injured While Directing Traffic

Posted: March 27th, 2018 in Accidents, Current Events

NewImage

An angry motorist hits a 17-year-old employee who is directing traffic and breaks his knee. Normally, you would think the road rage driver would be at fault. But a UK court fined McDonalds $200,000.

Why? It was a repeat incident. Two previous employees had been hurt while directing traffic. And McDonalds didn’t train the employees how to direct traffic.

What do you think? Would a good root cause analysis of the previous injuries and effective corrective actions have prevented this accident?

Monday accidents & lessons learned: Does what you see match what is happening?

Posted: March 26th, 2018 in Accidents, Great Human Factors, Human Performance, Investigations

>

An incident report from NASA’s Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) gives insight into a pilot’s recurring, problematic observation. Through distraction and confusion, a Bonanza pilot misperceived the runway edge and centerline lights as they cycled off and on. Air Traffic Control (ATC) let him know that the centerline lights were constant, not blinking.

The pilot summarized his experience, “I was transiting the final approach path of . . . Runway 16R and observed the runway edge and centerline lights cycle on and off . . . at a rate of approximately 1 per second. It was very similar to the rate of a blinking traffic light at a 4-way vehicle stop. The [3-blade] propeller speed was 2,400 RPM. This was observed through the entire front windscreen and at least part of the pilot side window. I queried ATC about the reason for the runway lights blinking and was told that they were not blinking. It was not immediately obvious what was causing this, but I did later speculate that it may have been caused by looking through the propeller arc.

“The next day [during] IFR training while on the VOR/DME Runway 16R approach, we observed the runway edge and centerline lights cycle on and off . . . at a rate slightly faster than 1 per second. The propeller speed was 2,500 RPM. I then varied the propeller speed and found that, at 2,700 RPM, the lights were observed strobing at a fairly high rate and, at 2,000 RPM, the blinking rate slowed to less than once per second. This was observed through the entire approach that terminated at the Missed Approach Point (MAP). The flight instructor was also surprised and mentioned that he had not seen this before, but also he doesn’t spend much time behind a 3-blade propeller arc.

“I would speculate that the Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) dimming system of the LED runway lights was phasing with my propeller, causing the observed effect. I would also speculate that the effect would . . . significantly differ at other LED dimming settings . . . and behind a 2-blade propeller.

“I found the effect to be entirely confusing and distracting and would not want to make a landing in such conditions.”

The TapRooT® System, Training, and Software have a dedicated history of R&D, human performance, and improvement. Learn with our best incident investigation and root cause analysis systems.

Construction’s Fatal Four – A Better Approach to Prevention

Posted: March 26th, 2018 in Accidents, Performance Improvement, Root Causes

In 2016, 21% of fatal injuries in the private sector were in the Construction industry as classified by the Department of Labor. That was 991 people killed in this industry (almost 3 people every day). Among these were the following types of fatality:

Falls – 384 (38.7%)
Struck by Object – 93 (9.4%)
Electrocutions – 82 (8.3%)
Caught-in/between – 72 (7.3%)

Imagine that. Eliminating just these 4 categories of fatalities would have saved over 630 workers in 2016.

Now, I’m not naive enough to think we can suddenly eliminate an entire category of injury or fatality in the U.S. However, I am ABSOLUTELY CERTAIN that, at each of our companies, we can take a close look at these types of issues and make a serious reduction in these rates. Simply telling our workers to “Be careful out there!” or “Follow the procedures and policies we give you” just won’t cut it.

NOTE: In the following discussion, when I’m talking about our workers and teammates, I am talking about ALL of us! We ALL violate policies and procedures every day. Don’t believe me? Take a look at the speedometer on your car on the way home from work tonight and honestly tell me you followed the speed limit all the way home.

As an example, take a look at your last few incident investigations. When there is an incident, one of the questions always asked is, “Did you know that you weren’t supposed to do that?” The answer is almost always, “Yes.” Yet, our teammates did it anyway.

Unfortunately, too many companies stop here. “Worker knew he should not have put his hand into a pinch point. Corrective action, Counseled the employee on the importance of following policy and remaining clear of pinch points.” What a completely useless corrective action! I’m pretty sure that the worker who just lost the end of his finger knows he should not have put his hand into that pinch point. Telling him to pay attention and be more careful next time will probably NOT be very effective.

If we really want to get a handle on these types of injuries, we must adopt a more structured, scientific strategy. I’d propose the following as a simple start:

1. Get out there and look! Almost every accident investigation finds that this has happened before, or that the workers often make this same mistake. If that is true, we should be getting out there and finding these daily mistakes.

2. To correct these mistakes, you must do a solid root cause analysis. Just yelling at our employees will probably not be effective. Remember, they are not bad people; they are just people. This is what people do. They try to do the best job they can, in the most efficient manner, and try to meet management’s expectations. We need to understand what, at the human performance level, allowed these great employees to do things wrong. THAT is what a good root cause analysis can do for you.

3. As in #2, when something bad DOES happen, you must do a solid RCA on those incidents, too. If your corrective actions are always:

  • Write a new policy or procedure
  • Discipline the employee
  • Conduct even MORE training

then your RCA methodology is not digging deep enough.

There is really no reason that we can’t get these types of injuries and fatalities under control. Start by doing a good root cause analysis to understand what really happened, and recognize and acknowledge why your team made mistakes. Only then can we apply effective corrective actions to eliminate those root causes. Let’s work together to keep our team safe.

Monday Motivation & Career Development – 5 Ways to Find More Time in Your Day

Posted: March 26th, 2018 in Career Development, Career Development Tips

If you’re like me, you spend most of your day running around feeling busy, but at the end of the day you’ve managed to get nothing done! Or maybe, you have more work than you started with. Other people find themselves in meetings all day and still have a lot left to do. You start asking yourself, “Where did all my time go?”

If this sounds familiar here are five practical ways to find more time in your day.

1.) Get Organized

This is the first thing that needs to be accomplished before you can do anything else. Think about all the time you waste looking through papers and/or files when you don’t have an efficient organized system in place.

  • Every morning take 10 minutes to organize and prepare your work area for the upcoming task of the day.
  • Also, prioritize your to-do list. What needs to be done right away?

2.) Block Off Work Time on Your Calendar

This is the time of day where you spend your time doing the work you need to do with no interruptions. In order to do this you need to find a time of day when you feel most productive, and meetings aren’t usually scheduled. For some people this is first thing in the morning. Other people find the best time is between 4:00 pm and 6:00 pm.

If you start to do this regularly the people around you will learn that this time is sacred, and you do not give up this time easily. They will start to schedule meeting and other important task around your work time.

3.) Create a Routine

Maintain a predictable schedule. Your schedule should allow you to do the activities that are most important to you. For some people that is waking up every morning at 5:00 am to read, write, meditate, or work out before heading into work. By creating this predictable schedule you eliminate worries of not achieving your goals.

4.) Delegate

Don’t work harder, work smarter. There are only so hours in a day, and only so many task you can complete with in that day. So take the time to train your direct reports on how to do task for you. Everyone has heard the saying, “If you want something done right, do it yourself,” but think about how easier your life would be if you removed some of those tasks from your daily schedule. Give those tasks to a well trained employee who will do it right for you.

5.) Say “No!”

It’s easy to say “yes,” but it is a lot harder to say “no.” If you are making decisions or attending meetings that other employees should be doing then you’re not doing your job, you’re doing theirs.

 

Two things are for certain… workloads aren’t getting any lighter, and you can’t change how many hours are in a day. There isn’t a one size fits all strategy when it comes to time management. Implement a strategy that works best for you. Then sit back, relax, and enjoy a more manageable work life!

Career Opportunities for Candidates with TapRooT® Skills

Posted: March 26th, 2018 in Career Development, Job Postings

Let your expertise be your point person. Professional training and skill sets in investigation, problem-solving, and root cause analysis will telegraph competency to the potential employer across the desk from you. If you have TapRooT® training and skills, step up into a new career through one of these global opportunities.

EHS Manager

Manager – EHS Quality

Principal Safety Advisor

Chemical Manufacturing

Field Safety Coordinator

SR Manager Safety (Power Gen)

Regional EHS Director

Being TapRooT® trained in troubleshooting and identifying root causes of issues and incidents is clearly the proven path to develop your skill sets and training. Pursue your goals through TapRooT® courses to advance your professional development.

Houston, TX, April 9, 2018, 2-Day TapRooT® Techniques

Wilmington, DE, April 11, 2018, 2-Day TapRooT® Techniques

Brisbane, Australia, April 16, 2018, 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Training

Las Vegas, NV, April 23, 2018, 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Training

Sao Paulo, Brazil, May 23, 2018, 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Training

Bogota, Colombia, May 28, 2018, 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Training

Perth, Australia, May 30, 2018, 2-Day TapRooT® Techniques

Singapore, Singapore, June 11, 2018, 2-Day TapRooT® Techniques

1947 Centralia Mine Disaster

Posted: March 25th, 2018 in Accidents

On March 25, 1947, the Centralia No. 5 coal mine exploded in Illinois. The explosions took the lives of 111 mine workers. At the time of the explosion, 142 men were in the mine. 65 of these men were killed by burns and the violence of the explosion, and 45 of the men were killed by afterdamp. Only 8 men were rescued, but unfortunately one of the rescued men died due to the effects of afterdamp. The other 24 men were able to escape the mine unaided.

So, what happened? The coal mine was extremely dry and dusty, and there were large deposits of coal dust throughout the mine. Very little effort had been made to to clean/load out excessive dust. Also, water had not been used to allay the dust at its source.  Then, an unfortunate blowout happened when coal dust ignited. Because of the coal dust build up throughout the mine, the explosion worsened. In total, there were six working sections of the mine and 4 out of the 6 sections were affected by flames and explosion violence. The other two sections of the mine were only affected by afterdamp.

The explosion was contained when it reached the rockdusted zones. It traveled through all the active mining rooms, and some abandoned rooms that were not treated with rockdust. The explosion also failed to move through areas that were partly caved in, and in some places filled with incombustible roof rash.

Disasters with a loss of life are often wake-up calls in major industries, and how important is to ensure that it never happens again.

TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis is taught globally to help industries avoid major accidents like this. Our 5-Day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Training offers advanced tools and techniques to find and fix root causes pro-actively and significant issues that may lead to major problems proactively.

Friday joke

Posted: March 23rd, 2018 in Jokes

Connect with Us

Filter News

Search News

Authors

Angie ComerAngie Comer

Software

Anne RobertsAnne Roberts

Marketing

Barb CarrBarb Carr

Editorial Director

Chris ValleeChris Vallee

Human Factors

Dan VerlindeDan Verlinde

VP, Software

Dave JanneyDave Janney

Safety & Quality

Garrett BoydGarrett Boyd

Technical Support

Ken ReedKen Reed

VP, Equifactor®

Linda UngerLinda Unger

Co-Founder

Mark ParadiesMark Paradies

Creator of TapRooT®

Michelle WishounMichelle Wishoun

Licensing Paralegal

Per OhstromPer Ohstrom

VP, Sales

Shaun BakerShaun Baker

Technical Support

Steve RaycraftSteve Raycraft

Technical Support

Wayne BrownWayne Brown

Technical Support

Success Stories

Fortunately, I already had a plan. I had previously used TapRooT to improve investigations…

Bi-State Development Corporation

In 1995, BellSouth Telecommunications noticed an increase in the number of service interruptions or outages…

Bell South
Contact Us