March 12, 2009 | Barb Carr

TapRooT® Root Cause Analysis in Amsterdam, the Netherlands

Amsterdam

© http://www.amsterdam.info

Amsterdam is the capital of the Netherlands and is one of the largest cities in Europe. “A stroll through the heart of Amsterdam reveals the countless attractions of a city that oozes history” (http://www.iamsterdam.com/en/visiting/placestogo/attractions).

A 5-day TapRooT® Advanced Root Cause Analysis Team Leader Training course will be held in Amsterdam on June 1-5, 2009, and is a great opportunity to receive excellent training while enjoying one of Europe’s favorite tourist destinations. A few of the popular attractions include:

The Anne Frank House

“The former hiding place, where Anne Frank wrote her diary, is now a well-known museum. The museum tells the history of the eight people in hiding and those who helped them during the war. Anne Frank’s diary is among the original objects on display” (http://www.annefrank.org/content.asp?pid=3&lid=2). The museum allows visitors to view the space where Anne Frank penned her now famous thoughts about her experiences during World War II.

The museum is open daily and tickets can be purchased online or at the museum. For more information, visit:

http://www.annefrank.org/content.asp?PID=19&LID=2.

Van Gogh Museum

The Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam is the location for the most extensive collection of Vincent van Gogh paintings in the world. The works by Van Gogh include self-portraits, still lifes, landscapes, and drawings. On Fridays, the museum is open late and hosts special events, in which the museum transforms the “central hall into a relaxed place to meet” (http://www3.vangoghmuseum.nl/). On certain Sundays, there are lectures on a variety of topics relating to art, which are hosted at the museum. The museum also includes works by other 19th century artists, including Manet, Monet, and Monticelli

The Amsterdam Dungeon

“Combining museum-worthy facts from Amsterdam’s history with theatrics, this attraction plays up the fear factor. Think plague, witches, the Spanish Inquisition and even the merciless Dutch East India Company. Actors breathe life into some of the city’s most gruesome moments; special effects make it all the more real. There’s also a ride and a labyrinth through lost Amsterdam” (http://tinyurl.com/dfltoc). Tickets can be purchased online.

Dam Square

“The Dam is one of Amsterdam’s oldest areas. In the 13th century, fishermen living along the Amstel constructed a bridge across the river, to which the Dam owes its name. This square was used as a central market, where the citizens of Amsterdam could buy all their groceries. Now this part of Amsterdam is brimful of activities both during the day and at night. Here you find historic buildings, famous museums and many shops, pubs and restaurants” (http://tinyurl.com/cbxvp3). Within the square, visitors can find the National Monument, the Royal Palace, and many other influential and historic buildings and monuments.

Hortus Botanicus Amsterdam – De Hortus

The Hortus was established in 1638 as a medicinal herb garden and is one of the oldest botanical gardens in the world. The garden grew rapidly after it was created due to the Dutch East India Company, which constantly brought in new spices and herbs as well as a variety of other plants. There is a café in the center of the gardens, and visitors can easily escape the bustle of the city. The Hortus is open daily.

FOR MORE INFO about the 5-day course in Amsterdam on June 1-5, 2009, please visit: http://taproot.com/courses.php?d=699&l=1

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